Aims of Industry

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Aims of Industry was founded in 1942 as an independent free enterprise corporate lobby group by business leaders in industry. It came into existence to combat nationalisation of key British industries such as sugar, iron and steel. It campaigned against the creation of the National Health Service in 1945. It was known as Aims for Freedom and Enterprise from 1975-78 and Aims from 1978-80.

'The End of Freedom in Britain', 1973 press advert from Aims of Industry in The Times, 28 December 1973; p. 4; Issue 58974; col A.

Although not directly involved in party politics, Aims of Industry is closely linked to the Conservative Party and the Freedom Association.

It makes an annual "National Free Enterprise Award", recipients of which have included F.A. Hayek, Margaret Thatcher and John Blundell.

Contents

Aims' Objectives

According to the history of Aims published by the organisation in 1982 their objectives were:

  • To defend free enterprise and freedom
  • To create a public belief in free enterprise so that the government can take the right decisions and companies can achieve their objectives.
  • To oppose, and wherever possible reduce, unnecessary government intervention by state ownership, control or excessive bureaucracy.[1]
'The moment of truth', press advert from Aims of Industry in The Daily Mirror, 2 October 1974; p. 25.
'One out, All out!', press advert from Aims of Industry in The Daily Mirror, 26 February 1974; p. 22.

In its early years Aims was at the forefront of corporate campaigning against democratic decision making in Britain. When the Conservative Party split over Europe in the 1980s and 90s, some of Aims key leaders took the 'Eurosceptic' side, rendering them marginal in transnational business circles - so much so that the 'pro-european' lobby group Britain in Europe backed by Transnational business carried a profile of them:

In March 1998 Aims of Industry launched a Campaign against the European Single Currency. Two Council members of Aims of Industry, Sir Nigel Mobbs and Jamie Borwick (Sponsor/Patron, Bruges Group, since 1989) were National Council members of Business for Sterling.[2]

Personnel

1942 - Founding members

Lord Perry of Stock Harvard, Chair of the Ford Motor Co. | S B Askew | A N Mobbs | Sir Felix Pole | J Arthur Rank | J V Rank | H G Starley | Sir George Usher | Garfield Weston[3]

1950s

1972

Council

Sir Ian Lyle, President of the council | Sir John Reiss, chairman of the council Col. B C Lockhart-Jervis, Deputy chairman of the Council | R W Dean | P L Fleming | W R B Foster | L S Hargreaves | Sir George Harriman | J P Hourston | W E Luke | T Steward Mackie | G A Mobbs | Michael A Sinclair Scott | L W Stevenson | F taylor | Nigel Vinson | Col. W H Whitbread | H A Whitson | R H Wilkins | Director Michael Ivens[3]

1974

President of the council Sir Ian Lyle | Chairman of the council Sir John Reiss | Vice-Presidents Col. B C Lockhart-Jervis | Hubert Starley Council: R W Dean Director Michael Ivens[4]

2003

Other people

Membership and funding

In 2004 Aims of Industry claimed 800 members, with six full-time members of staff.[2]

Past funders are thought to have included Balfour Beatty [6] and Slough Estates [7] British American Tobacco supported Aims from 1949 until 1991.[8]

Campaigns

Tate not state

Tate not State the successful campaign run by Aims of Industry to prevent the nationalisation of the sugar industry on behalf of Tate and Lyle
History’s most famous sugar lump was ‘Mr Cube’, an animated cartoon character born in July 1949 in a climate of grey austerity, rationing and contentious nationalisation proposals. Mr Cube became sugar’s brand image, the company logo of Tate & Lyle and a symbol of political embarrassment and electoral setback for the Labour government in the February 1950 General Election.
Peter Runge, the company’s campaign strategist, has recalled how ‘we were strongly advised to have a cartoon character who, if he caught the public’s imagination, could say the most outrageous things and get away with it, and who could act as a buffer between the public and Tate & Lyle’. Brandishing his sword of free enterprise and protected by his T&L shield, Mr Cube would ‘say sensible, cogent or outrageous things’ with appropriate grimaces and gesticulations, allowing Tates to ‘concentrate on attacking the Socialist policy in a somewhat more dignified manner’. [9]


Publications, Related, Resources and References

Aims of Industry publications

1940s

Aims published a series titled 'The Voice of Industry', in the 1940s and 1950s. vol.1 no.5 - Vol.1 no.13 were published between 1946-1953[10]

  • 'Tell them in Simple Terms', The Voice of Industry[10]
  • G. L. Schwartz, 'Bulk Purchases - the case against state trading' The Voice of Industry[10]
  • John Robert Clynes Stop the Class War in Industry, The Voice of Industry Aims of Industry, 1946[11]
  • 'The Case for the Liverpool Cotton Exchange', The Voice of Industry[10]
  • 'Greater Production or a Lower Level of Life' The Voice of Industry[10]

1950s

1960s

  • A Case for a Tax Refund to Industry, Aims of Industry (January 1968)
  • Import Deposits: A Survey of Effects on Industry and Business, Aims of Industry (January 1969)
  • Industry and Political Contributions , Aims of Industry (January 1969)
Reds under the Bed, Aims of Industry (January 1974)

1970s

  • The Winter of Our Discontents, Aims of Industry (January 1970)
  • Posts and Telephones: a Survey of Users' Reports on Service, Aims of Industry (January 1970)
  • Dead Ducks and Lame Ducks - Must the Public Always Pay, Aims of Industry (January 1972)
  • Aims of Industry 30 years of Aims of Industry London: Aims of Industry 1972. ISBN: 090003565X
  • Edition Programme, Aims of Industry (January 1973)
  • Industrial Concentration and Public Policy, Aims of Industry (January 1973)
  • Aims of Industry, Organised Political Pressure on Companies Anti-Anti-Report (Counter Counter Information Services), January 1973
  • To Fight Together or Hang Separately against the Most Corporatist Document, Aims of Industry (January 1973)
  • Alan Walters Money and Inflation Aims of Industry, undated, but around 1974.
  • Organisation and Financing of the French Communist Party, Aims of Industry (January 1974)
  • Shipbuilding, Ship Repairing & Marine Engineering:Suppliers' Attitudes to Nationalization: Suppliers' Attitudes to Nationalization , Aims of Industry (January 1974)
  • Mass Unemployment, Can It Be Halted, Aims of Industry (January 1974)
  • Guide to Industrial Participation: Essential Steps, Essential Research, Aims of Industry (January 1974)
  • Halfway to 1984 - 1979, Aims of Industry (January 1974)
  • The Industries That Labour Wants to Nationalize:Ship Building: Ship Repairing & Marine Engineering, Aims of Industry (January 1974)
  • The Industries That Labour Wants to Nationalize:Insurance: Insurance, Aims of Industry (January 1974)
  • Socialists on the Board: The Case against the National Enterprise Board, Aims of Industry (January 1974)
  • Local Government Corruption: Cancer and Cure, Aims of Industry (January 1973) *Evidence for the Royal Commission on the Press, Aims of Industry (January 1974)
  • Always to Be Shielded: Must We Move towards Unionocracy, Aims of Industry (January 1974)
  • The Industry Act: Should Industry Help the Executioner, Aims of Industry (January 1974)
  • The Industries That Labour Wants to Nationalize: the 100 Top Companies, Aims of Industry (January 1974)
  • Mr. Shelepin Smiles: Radical Revolutionary Transformations and the Tactics of Confrontation, Aims of Industry (January 1974)
  • The Industries That Labour Wants to Nationalize:Construction, Aims of Industry (January 1974)
  • The Industries That Labour Wants to Nationalize: Pharmaceuticals, Aims of Industry (January 1974)
  • The Industries That Labour Wants to Nationalize: Land, Aims of Industry (January 1974)
  • Reds under the Bed, Aims of Industry (January 1974)
  • The Trade Union and Labour Relations (Amendment) Bill: The Right to Work-the Right to Write, Aims of Industry (January 1975)
  • Trouble at Britain's Docks, Aims of Industry (January 1975)
  • Let's Back the Workers on Nationalization, and the Labour Voter, Too, Aims for Freedom and Enterprise (January 1975)
  • Evidence to the Committee on Aid to Political Parties, Aims for Freedom and Enterprise (January 1975)
  • Electors' Opinions on the Communist Danger to Britain and British Industry: A Survey Carried Out for Aims of Industry by NOP Market Research, Aims of Industry (January 1975)
  • The Image of Britain Abroad: An Investigation of Attitudes by Foreign Correspondents to British Industry, Aims for Freedom and Enterprise (January 1975)
  • Progress Report from KGB Station Chief, London, England to Comrade Yuri Andropov, KGB Supreme Chief, Moscow, Date, Eve of 25th Communist Party Congress, 1976 (Special Report as Requested), Aims for Freedom and Enterprise (January 1976)
  • Attitudes of Students to Politics, Economics and Society: Survey, Aims for Freedom and Enterprise (January 1976)
  • Trade Union Political Funds , Michael William Ivens Aims for Freedom and Enterprise (January 1978)
  • International Papers on the Revival of Freedom & Enterprise by Michael William Ivens, Aims for Freedom and Enterprise (January 1978)

1980s

  • Michael Forsyth MP Barriers to Privatisation, Aims of Industry, 1984.
  • Hubert Starley 40 Years Fighting for Free Enterprise: A Personal History of Aims of Industry, Aims of Industry.

Related

Resources

References

  1. Hubert Starley 40 Years Fighting for Free Enterprise: A Personal History of Aims of Industry, Aims of Industry.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Aims of Industry profile, Britain in Europe website, accessed January 2004. No longer online, but available via the Internet Archive
  3. 3.0 3.1 Aims of Industry 30 years of Aims of Industry London: Aims of Industry 1972.
  4. Reds under the Bed, Aims of Industry (January 1974)
  5. Obituary: 'Michael Ivens: Champion of the libertarian right and business freedom', Roger Cowe, Wednesday November 21, 2001 The Guardian [1]
  6. [2]
  7. Tories' business backers: are they ethical?, Friends of the Earth press release, 4 June 2001.
  8. [3], [4].
  9. Ron Noon, 'Goodbye Mr Cube', History Today, October 2001 | Volume: 51 Issue: 10 | Page 40 - 22
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 10.3 10.4 Warwick University Federation of British Industries collection 1916 - 1965
  11. Amazon.co..uk John Robert Clynes
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