Wafic Said

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Syrian-born Wafic Said is reported to be a 'former operator of a kebab restaurant who made millions in commissions on a 1985 British Aerospace arms deal to sell Tornado fighters to the Saudi royal family'.[1]

Said's chief Saudi patron is reported to be Prince Bandar.[2]

His wife Rosemary Said, has given the Conservative Party almost £580,000 and is reportedly a member of David Cameron's Leaders' Group of elite donors that enjoy direct access to the UK Prime Minister by virtue of donating more than £50,000.

Tax loophole

In an article in 2002 on the subject of how 'Rich people are costing Britain millions in lost tax by not registering their houses in their own names', the Guardian reports that Said's apartment in Eaton Square, London (one of London's most expensive addresses) is worth £9million and is owned by offshore company Tusmore Estates SA.[3]. The article claims that through the exploitation of legal loopholes, 'wealthy individuals... appear to be enjoying the country's choicest property virtually tax-free'. The article also mentions Margaret Thatcher, Mohamed Al Fayed, David Potter, Christopher Ondaatje, Lakshmi Mittal, Uri David, Rupert Allason, Anthony Tabatznik, Prince Bandar and Isaac Kaye as others who are not the registered owners of their homes and may benefit from such a loophole.

In 2002, Said was also 'erecting a Palladian mansion on the site of Tusmore House, a 3,000-acre estate he bought in 1987'.[4] According to his spokesman, "It has been placed in a trust to make the arrangements simple for the family."

References

  1. Evans, R & Hencke, D. (2002) 'Tax loopholes on homes benefit the rich and cost UK millions'. The Guardian 25th May 2002. Accessed 22nd May 2008
  2. Evans, R & Hencke, D. (2002) 'Tax loopholes on homes benefit the rich and cost UK millions'. The Guardian 25th May 2002. Accessed 22nd May 2008
  3. Evans, R & Hencke, D. (2002) 'Tax loopholes on homes benefit the rich and cost UK millions'. The Guardian 25th May 2002. Accessed 22nd May 2008
  4. Evans, R & Hencke, D. (2002) 'Tax loopholes on homes benefit the rich and cost UK millions'. The Guardian 25th May 2002. Accessed 22nd May 2008