HN322

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This article is part of the Undercover Research Portal at Powerbase - investigating corporate and police spying on activists



Part of a series on
undercover police officers
'HN322'
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Alias: unknown
Deployment: 1968
Unit:
Targets:
unknown

HN322 is the cipher given to a former Special Demonstration Squad undercover officer deployed in 1968 into the South East London branch of the Vietnam Solidarity Group (no known cover name). They had a 30 year career in they Metropolitan Police, including VIP protection duties. In his 70s.[1][2]

As an SDS officer

According to his risk assessment:[3]

[His deployment] appears to have taken place at some point between 1967 and 1970, although this period also includes VIP protection duties. There is some evidence that his deployment may have lasted only two months, from September to December 1968.
HN322 is shown as having been deployed into the Vietnam Solidarity Campaign (South East London) in documentation, but denies he actually infiltrated any group.

He did not use a cover name. In his own recollection,he was re-allocated to other duties before being deployed.[1] He also recalled he asked to been taken off his undercover job as he did not want to be away from home so much nor did he consider himself brave enough to do the work of long term infiltration.[4]

In his February 2018 ruling, Mitting noted:[2]

Documents... show that he attended a small number of public meetings held to prepare for the anti-Vietnam war demonstration in London on 27 October 1968 in the company of another officer in the Special Demonstration Squad and reported on them to the founding head of the Squad, Conrad Dixon. His recollection that he was not deployed may, therefore be wrong; but the nature of his reporting suggests that it was a traditional Special Branch deployment, not an infiltration. Nothing of which I am aware contradicts his recollection that he left the squad soon after.

In the Undercover Policing Inquiry

HN322 is not a core participant in the UCPI, and their interests are represented by the Metropolitan Police's Designated Lawyer Team. The Metrpolitan Police made an application to have release of his real name restricted.[5] This was done before HN322 was consulted about the matter, thoguh he did support the application.[4]

HN322 did not want to be interviewed by the risk assessors but submitted a written statement instead.[3]

Documents released 4 January 2018: Open application for restriction order, Open risk assessment, Open impact statement.

Mitting stated in November 2017 that he intended to grant the order restricting HN322's real name from being published, and noted:[1]

In the unlikely event that he is required to provide evidence to the Inquiry, publication of his real name will serve no useful purpose. The interference which it would occasion with his right to respect for his private life would not be justified.

The Restriction order application was heard in open hearing on 5 February 2018.[6] and the ruling handed down on 20 February 2018 in favour of restricting his real name, saying '[HN322] may be asked to provide a statement to the Inquiry, but is unlikely to be called to give evidence'.[2]

Notes

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 In the matter of section 19 (3) of the Inquiries Act 2005 Applications for restriction orders in respect of the real and cover names of officers of the Special Operations Squad and the Special Demonstrations Squad ‘Minded to’ note 2, Undercover Policing Inquiry, 14 November 2017 (accessed 15 November 2017)
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Sir John Mitting, In the matter of section 19(3) of the Inquiries Act 2005 Applications for restriction orders in respect of the real and cover names of officers of the Special Operations Squad and the Special Demonstrations Squad - Ruling, Undercover Policing Inquiry, 20 February 2018 (accessed 4 March 2018).
  3. 3.0 3.1 David Reid, HN322 Risk Assessment (gisted, version 2), Metropolitan Police Service, 15 Nov 2017 (accessed 10 March 2018 via ucpi.org.uk).
  4. 4.0 4.1 'HN322', HN322 Impact Statement (open version), Metropolitan Police, (accessed 10 March 2018, via ucpi.org.uk).
  5. HN322 Restriction Order Application (open version), Metropolitan Police, 31 July 2017 (accessed 10 March 2018, via ucpi.org.uk).
  6. Press notice: Hearing on restriction orders in respect of HN23, HN40, HN241, HN322 and HN348, Undercover Policing Inquiry, 15 January 2018 (accessed 15 January 2018).