Difference between revisions of "User talk:Claire Harkins"

From Powerbase
Jump to: navigation, search
(EPC Alcohol: new section)
Line 25: Line 25:
  
 
[[Penn Schoen and Berland]]
 
[[Penn Schoen and Berland]]
 +
 +
== EPC Alcohol ==
 +
 +
In 2001 the European Commission began to lay the foundations of an alcohol strategy for Europe. 
 +
 +
 +
The EPC were asked to chair a series of four meetings intended to‘identify areas of agreement between the stakeholders as to actions that can contribute effectively to the reduction of alcohol-related harm and indicate where and why there is disagreement, and in so doing help create confidence between stakeholders’.<ref> Corporate Europe Observatory, [http://www.corporateeurope.org/observer2/epc.html Part One: The European Policy Centre] European Think Tank Series, Issue 2, October 1998, </ref> According to the [[Institute of Alcohol Studies]] these meetings were "At the behest of the [alcohol] Industry, DG SANCO officials organised roundtable discussion through the aegis of the European Policy Centre, between representatives of the Commission, Member States, Industry and NGOs to discuss the draft proposals for a European Alcohol Policy Strategy". <ref> Rutherford, D. (2006) [http://www.ias.org.uk/What-we-do/Publication-archive/The-Globe/Issue-3-2006/Editorial.aspx AIS Editorial] The Globe Issue accessed 28th October 2013 </ref>  The meetings involved working through 78 issues or policy proposals related to alcohol harm reduction that were presented by the [[European Commission]] in an informal draft of their communication on Alcohol.  Participants graded each item using a traffic lights system, green issues were broadly agreeable to all present, amber a possibility and red a clear no.  68 of the measures were marked green,  Seven were amber, indicating no overall agreement but that some compromises might be reached.  Three were categorised as red issues where the industry simply refused to negotiate. <ref> Anderson & Baumberg, [http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/pdf/10.1111/j.1360-0443.2006.01713.x Alcohol Policy: Who should sit at the table?] ''Addiction Volume'' 102, No. 2 pp 335-336 (online subscription required)</ref>
 +
 
 +
Dr [[Peter Anderson]], author of the Alcohol In Europe report (2006) commented “The European Policy Centre (EPC) describes itself as ‘an independent, not-for-profit think tank, committed to making European integration work’.  Its independence is, of course, ensured by the fact that its prime corporate members and sponsors include [[InBev]], the world’s largest brewer and [[Philip Morris]] International”. <ref> Anderson & Baumberg, [http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/pdf/10.1111/j.1360-0443.2006.01713.x Alcohol Policy: Who should sit at the table?] ''Addiction Volume'' 102, No. 2 pp 335-336 (online subscription required)</ref> The final outcome of this process, and other consultations resulted in the launch of the [[European Alcohol and Health Forum]].
 +
 +
In 1998 [[Diageo]] and The [[Weinberg Group]] helped set up a [[European Policy Centre]] Forum.  Correspondence shows a representative of [[Diageo]] trying to organise a discount for a booking made by [[Weinberg Group]] for a forum run by the EPC.  <ref> Legacy Library, [http://legacy.library.ucsf.edu/documentStore/

Revision as of 22:41, 28 October 2013

Organic Industry Structure

[1]

National Organisation for Foetal Alcohol Syndrome UK

Booze in News Past Stories

Former Booze in the News Stories

Alcohol Price and Consumption

Mephedrone
[2]
  1. Howard, Philip H. 2009. Organic Industry Structure. Media-N Journal of the New Media Caucus, 5(3).-online.png|Howard, Philip H. 2009. Organic Industry Structure. Media-N Journal of the New Media Caucus, 5(3)-online|Acquisitions by the Top 30 Food Processors in North America. (click to resize)
  2. Fantasia Mephedrone accessed 13th June 2012

European Travel Retail Confederation

Penn Schoen and Berland

EPC Alcohol

In 2001 the European Commission began to lay the foundations of an alcohol strategy for Europe.


The EPC were asked to chair a series of four meetings intended to‘identify areas of agreement between the stakeholders as to actions that can contribute effectively to the reduction of alcohol-related harm and indicate where and why there is disagreement, and in so doing help create confidence between stakeholders’.[1] According to the Institute of Alcohol Studies these meetings were "At the behest of the [alcohol] Industry, DG SANCO officials organised roundtable discussion through the aegis of the European Policy Centre, between representatives of the Commission, Member States, Industry and NGOs to discuss the draft proposals for a European Alcohol Policy Strategy". [2] The meetings involved working through 78 issues or policy proposals related to alcohol harm reduction that were presented by the European Commission in an informal draft of their communication on Alcohol. Participants graded each item using a traffic lights system, green issues were broadly agreeable to all present, amber a possibility and red a clear no. 68 of the measures were marked green, Seven were amber, indicating no overall agreement but that some compromises might be reached. Three were categorised as red issues where the industry simply refused to negotiate. [3]

Dr Peter Anderson, author of the Alcohol In Europe report (2006) commented “The European Policy Centre (EPC) describes itself as ‘an independent, not-for-profit think tank, committed to making European integration work’. Its independence is, of course, ensured by the fact that its prime corporate members and sponsors include InBev, the world’s largest brewer and Philip Morris International”. [4] The final outcome of this process, and other consultations resulted in the launch of the European Alcohol and Health Forum.

In 1998 Diageo and The Weinberg Group helped set up a European Policy Centre Forum. Correspondence shows a representative of Diageo trying to organise a discount for a booking made by Weinberg Group for a forum run by the EPC. <ref> Legacy Library, [http://legacy.library.ucsf.edu/documentStore/
  1. Corporate Europe Observatory, Part One: The European Policy Centre European Think Tank Series, Issue 2, October 1998,
  2. Rutherford, D. (2006) AIS Editorial The Globe Issue accessed 28th October 2013
  3. Anderson & Baumberg, Alcohol Policy: Who should sit at the table? Addiction Volume 102, No. 2 pp 335-336 (online subscription required)
  4. Anderson & Baumberg, Alcohol Policy: Who should sit at the table? Addiction Volume 102, No. 2 pp 335-336 (online subscription required)