Stuart Derbyshire

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Stuart Derbyshire in 2007

Stuart Derbyshire is an academic and is associated with the libertarian and anti-environmental LM network, having written for Living Marxism, written for Spiked, [1], adjudicated for Debating Matters, spoken on 14 Battle of Ideas panel appearances, spoken at a Manchester Salon, consulted for the Pro-Choice Forum and is a spokesperson for Academics For Academic Freedom. According to a former online CV Derbyshire was the 'Science correspondent' for LM magazine from July 1994 and then undertook the same role for its successor Spiked from 2000 onwards[2].

Current and Recent Roles

Derbyshire has been an Associate Professor at the National University of Singapore since July 2013, where he has a joint position at the Clinical Imaging Research Centre. He has also Judged for Debating Matters and written for Spiked since 2000 and has sat on the editorial board for the journal 'Contemporary Hypnosis' since February 2010. He has also been an Editorial Board member for Pain (since January 2009), Psychosomatic Medicine (since February 2008), Hospital Imaging & Radiology Europe (since August 2007), and psycCRITIQUES (since March 2007). In addition he has been the Associate Editor of the Pain and Imaging Section of the Journal of Cancer Pain (since January 2004), a study section member & ad-hoc reviewer for the National Institutes of Health (since 199), and a member of the International Association for the Study of Pain (since 1997). He has been a member of the Association for Psychosomatic Society since 2009 and has spoken at at least two events organised by the Manchester Salon. The first of these in 2009 involved a discussion on behavioural economics, whilst the second, in 2011, was entitled 'I feel your pain: human and animal suffering'. Around this time (2009-2010) he was consulted extensively for Beattie McGuiness Bungay, and also consulted for the University of Birmingham at Alabama (2008-2013). He was also a consultant for the Innovative Medicines Initiative joint undertaking between the European Union and the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations (EFPIA) from 2008-2009. Prior to this he contributed to the Science and Technology Committee report on abortion law, in October 2007, was a member of the RCOG Working Party on Fetal Awareness in June 2006, and Testified before the House of Commons Science and Technology Committee in January 2005[3]

Previous Roles

Academic From May 2005 to july 2013 derbyshire was a Reader in Psychology & director of the pain laboratory at Birmingham University Imaging Centre (BUIC) and and Adjunct professor in the department of Radiology at the University of Pittsburgh. Before this he was Secondary Assistant Professor in the Department of Anesthesiology and Primary Assistant Professor (Primary) in the Department of Radiology at the University of Pittsburgh from August 2004 - May 2005. From September 2000 to August 2004 he was Assistant Professor in the Department of Anesthesiology before which he was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Anesthesiology at the University of California (July 1998-August 2000).

Memberships, Consultancies and associations According to a (circa) 2009 version of his CV he was a founding member of the Pain and Genetics Special Interest Group for the American Pain Society in May 2004. In March 2004 he testified in opposition to House Bill 1315 before the Virginia State Senate, and consulted for Planned Parenthood Advocates of Virginia until August 2005. He also consulted for the New York Civil Liberties Association from February 2004 until August 2005, prior to which he began a role on the website editorial board for the American Pain Society, which continued from January 2003 until January 2007. Between 2002-2010 he was also a consultant for the LM Network linked Pro-Choice Forum. In March 1996 he also gave evidence to the Rawlinson Commission of Inquiry into Fetal Sentience. He worked for Living Marxism as their Science Editor from June 1994 until at least March 1999.

Research Interests

Derbyshire's main research interests have been in the areas of neuroimaging and pain. His main focus, according to his staff profile at the National University of Singapore, 'is to understand pain without touch and he has used hypnosis, visual illusions and priming to generate pain without touch in both normal volunteers and patients with chronic pain'[4]. His research funders have included the Medical research Council, the Economic and Social Research Council, and the Wellcome Trust. His profile on the website ORC experts (an online business-to-business expert knowledge sharing service[5]) states his:

research is mainly concerned with the nature of pain, especially pain that occurs in the absence of identifiable pathology. Consequently, his research abuts psychology, cognitive science, and philosophical ethics...Current research involves both theoretical and empirical research on the nature of pain and the possible causes of a rising incidence of pain or other somatic illness in the absence of identifiable pathology and in the context of improving health and longevity. He is also involved in work to understand implicit influences on health and consumer behaviour and has extensive experience with priming procedures and implicit measure of preference (such as the IAT). Last year, Expert consulted for Carling and Center Parcs on these issues. He has been a member of research faculty at the Universities of Pittsburgh and California, Los Angeles and is currently a Reader in Psychology at the Expert's University, UK, and also the director of pain research at the Birmingham University Imaging Centre. His work is funded by a grant from the Medical Research Council[6]

History of Funding

Views

Media Presence

Derbyshire has been referenced in the media around 92 times on a variety of issues[7], with the main topic he is referenced on being issues surrounding fetal pain and abortion (around 40). The next most frequent topic he has been asked to comment on relates to the ability of people to 'physically feel images of pain' (14), followed by 'mobile phone use in hospitals' (11 (9 of which were written with fellow LM Network associate Adam Burgess)), 'back-pain' and 'alternative medicine' (6), 'University education in decline' (6), the idea of 'NUDGE parenting' (6), 'hypnosis and pain' (3), 'Animal research' (3 (1 written with fellow LM Network associate Mick Hume)), 'smart drugs' (2), HIV/AIDS (1), computer games (1), and risk management (1).

On Pain

His main prominence in the media has clearly been in relation to foetal experiences of pain. He argues that it is only with experience that pain can be understood, and thus it is highly improbable that a foetus can feel pain. He also argues in favour of vivisection for the same reason, arguing animals are incapable of experiencing pain in a human sense, which incorporates an understanding of the self and an ability to comprehend hypothetical future scenarios as a result of pain, highlighting a psychological component to the experience of pain. Similarly his research regarding the demonstration that people can physically feel pain through watching videos or images of others experiencing pain seeks to highlight the subjective aspects of pain.

Mobile phone use

Whilst Derbyshire appears to have carried out academic research for most of the topics he has been referenced on in the media, he appears to have carried out no academic research other than a short piece conducted with Adam Burgess, also of the LM Network, entitled ‘use of mobile phones in hospitals’, in which they argue against restrictions placed on mobile phones in hospitals due to interference with hospital machinery, which they argue is unfounded. Interestingly, this report was often cited in the media under a byeline which suggested that doctors were calling for these bans to be removed. However, the only people referenced in these articles appeared to be both Derbyshire and Burgess, or one or the other. Whilst they are doctors in the academic sense, they are not doctors in the medical sense, making it unclear to whom the byelines refer.[8]

Writing for Living Marxism/LM (1994-1999)

Derbyshire wrote 10 articles for Living Marxism/LM and 2 commentaries between 1994 and 1999, as their Science editor, writing about the possibilities of drugs which could enhance human potential, Aids (4), a book review, genetics' influence on personality and intelligence (3), whether a fetus can feel pain, and animal research (1).

On 'Wonder drugs'

Somewhere in between the two competing ideas - of drugs as a simple cure for illness on the one hand, and cosmetic pharmacology on the other - lies the real possibility of using drugs to improve the brain's basic mechanisms, such as laying down memories and holding attention...The possibility of drugs that can enhance achievement is considered problematic by the critics because they have a low opinion of most people's ability to control their own actions. In today's climate, it is fine to say drugs can change your personality, it is fine to propose tranquillising people to make them 'comfortable' with their uncomfortable circumstances. But a hint that drugs could enhance everybody's potential is frowned upon[9]

On HIV/AIDS

Writing for LM Derbyshire suggests that the fears surrounding the spread of HIV/AIDS were a moral crusade to prevent sexual promiscuity:

Across the West, the notion of a heterosexual Aids explosion was promoted by governments and moralists who saw it as a potent weapon with which to encourage young people to stay on the sexual straight and narrow. Across the West, the notion of a heterosexual Aids explosion was promoted by governments and moralists who saw it as a potent weapon with which to encourage young people to stay on the sexual straight and narrow[10]

On genes and personal responsibility

He argues it will never be possible to attribute human action to genes alone:

Any attempt to link genetic difference in a causal way to behavioural difference is bound to fail. Human behaviour does not have the same biological element as human health. A key difference is that human behaviour, at root, contains the element of motivation. This motivation is both common to all humans, and yet different to each and every individual. Individual aspirations are shaped by historical context, and by personal experience. It follows that genetic variety, or even genetic defect, cannot in any way cause something that is of a non-biological character[11]

He also argues that research should be carried out into the possibility of manipulating genes towards improving intelligence through genetics:

So this is the scientific story so far: family studies indicate that genes play a role in variation in intelligence, but we do not as yet know which genes, or how many, are involved. Finding these genes will immediately raise the question of what society or individuals should do with the knowledge. My view is that, far from being afraid to find the truth in this area, society should be prepared to act upon it, even though economic, educational and other forms of inequality are the biggest barrier to most people realising their potential. For if genes do account for about 50 per cent of the variability in IQ scores, and if we believe that general cognitive ability is useful in life, then manipulating genes or their effects to increase IQ should be investigated[12]

On the unlikehood of a fetus feeling pain

He stresses the importance of the psychological components of pain in addition to any physical/biological reality when considering whether a fetus is able to feel pain:

After 26 weeks, the human fetus has the necessary biological apparatus for pain, shows a localised behavioural response to stimulation, and launches a hormonal stress response to needling. But is this sufficient evidence to conclude that the fetus can experience pain? Whether or not the fetus feels what we understand as pain hinges not on its biological development, but on its conscious development. Unless it can be reasonably demonstrated that the fetus has a conscious appreciation of pain after 26 weeks' gestation, then its responses to noxious stimulation are still essentially reflex responses, exactly as those prior to 26 weeks...the experience of pain is a consequence of developmental processes through which the fetus and new-born baby have yet to pass.[13]

Writing for Spiked

Word cloud of Spiked titles, written by Stuart Derbyshire, 2000-2014. wordle website, 9 March 2015.

Derbyshire has written for Spiked since 2000 as their Science editor, contributing close to 70 article by 2014, many of which continued from topics he explored in Living Marxism, but with a greater focus on the concept of pain.

HIV/AIDS

Derbyshire has written a number of articles for Spiked on the issue of HIV/AIDS, which was often covered by LM/Living Marxism. His argument remains in line with former coverage in LM/Living Marxism, that the danger of the HIV/AIDS virus has always been inflated, particularly with regards to heterosexual transmission. This may well be built on his ideological foundations that view the state as overly paternal and intent on moralising to its citizens. These views faciliate his argument that the state sought to elevate the risk posed by the virus, in this case, in order to control and alter people's sexual impulses and desires. Thus, in spite of the fact that globally almost 78 million have been infected since the beginning of the epidemic [14], with 50% of those dying of HIV/AIDS, Derbyshire feels content to argue under the byeline: 'we have pretty much tamed the AIDS virus. So why won't we celebrate?'[15]. This line of argument is also strange given the fact that HIV/AIDS remained ranked as the joint 6th highest leading cause of death in 2012[16]. Given such figures it seems strange to celebrate, particularly given an apparent disdain for Western racism towards Africa in many of Derbyshire's articles, and the reality that the HIV/AIDS pandemic affects Africa more than anywhere else.

Career Chronology

Educational Background

Other Links with the Network

Battle of Ideas Panel Appearances

2005

2006

2007

  • Saturday 27th October 2007 - Dr Stuart Derbyshire appeared with: Professor Edzard Ernst (Laing chair in Complementary Medicine, Peninsula Medical School, Universities of Exeter and Plymouth), Dr Toby Murcott (science writer and broadcaster), and Bríd Hehir (development manager Do Good Charity; former NHS health visitor and senior manager, has written for Living Marxism and Spiked ), discussing ‘CAM – junk science or genuine alternative?’, Battle of Ideas[42].

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

Other Presentations, Invited Lectureships and Seminars

1997

  • Stuart Derbyshire, attended 'Foetal pain Does it Exist?', University of Oxford, 29 February 1997
  • Stuart Derbyshire, attended 'Exploring the bio-psycho-social model: Meaningless catchphrase or fundamental cornerstone?', British Pain Society, Annual Scientific Meeting, Newcastle UK, April 1997.
  • Stuart Derbyshire, attended 'the neuropsychology of pain', CURE Neuroenteric Biology Group, UCLA USA, 3rd November 1997.

1998

  • Stuart Derbyshire, attended 'How can we assess pain in animals?', the William Dick Centennial Animal Welfare Debate, The University of Edinburgh Veterinary School, Scotland, 23 May 1998.
  • Stuart Derbyshire, attended 'Central representation of somatic and visceral pain', Fourth International Symposium on Brain-Gut Interactions, University of California San Diego Campus USA, 12-15 July 1998.
  • Stuart Derbyshire, attended 'The problem of variation in assessing group differences using functional imaging techniques', at the Institute of Psychiatry, London UK, 11 September 1998; The University of Manchester UK 14th September 1998; and Glaxo Institute Cambridge, UK, 16 September 1998.
  • Stuart Derbyshire, attended 'The central correlates of visceral pain and anticipation in controls versus patients suffering irritable bowel syndrome', IBS CURE GI Clinical and Outcomes Research Meeting Los Angeles, October 1998.

1999

  • Stuart Derbyshire, attended 'Functional imaging studies of back pain and opiate analgesia: Back Pain – Will the Next Millenium be Better?' at the Symposium in honor of Professor Malcolm Jayson, Oxford Lodge, Manchester UK 22nd October 1999.
  • Stuart Derbyshire, attended 'Mechanisms underlying chronic pain: Discussion Meeting: The Biological Basis of Chronic Fatigue Disorders,', Novartis Foundation/Lindbury Trust, London UK 7-8th November 1999.

2000

  • Stuart Derbyshire, attended 'Gender differences in response to pain', Symposium in honor of Professor Malcolm Harris, Eastman Dental Hospital, London UK, 18th – 21st September 2000.

2001

  • Stuart Derbyshire, attended 'Visceral afferent pathways', Fourth International Symposium on Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders, The Pfister Hotel Milwaukee Wisconsin, 30 March – 2 April 2001.
  • Stuart Derbyshire, attended 'Imaging the anatomy of pain', North West Pain Research Group and Hope Hospital Neuroscience Forum, University of Manchester UK, 7 June 2001.
  • Stuart Derbyshire, attended 'Aids in Africa', TRASNA Society of Trinity College, World Aids Day Conference, Dublin, Ireland, 29-30 November 2001.

2002

2003

  • Stuart Derbyshire, attended 'Imaging pain: The inside story or just a pretty picture?', University of Bath, Pain Forum, 5 February 2003, Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Bath, UK.
  • Stuart Derbyshire, attended 'Picturing the brain in pain', Anesthesiology Grand Rounds, 12 March 2003,

University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.

  • Stuart Derbyshire, attended 'Functional brain imaging', at the Second Asian-Pacific Postgraduate Course on Gastrointestinal Motility (APPGM), 22-24 November 2003, Seoul, Korea.
  • Stuart Derbyshire, attended 'Visceral afferent pathways' at the Second Asian-Pacific Postgraduate Course on Gastrointestinal Motility (APPGM), 22-24 November 2003, Seoul, Korea.

2004

  • Stuart Derbyshire, attended 'Pain in the Brain and Lower Parts of the Anatomy', at the Royal Holloway and New Bedford College, London, Department of Psychology, 6 April 2004.
  • Stuart Derbyshire, attedned the event 'Fish Pain is a Misnomer' at the University of Glasgow, Department of Neurology, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Scotland, 16-17 April 2004.
  • Stuart Derbyshire, moderated the event 'Neurogenetics: Buzzword, New Frontier, Both or Neither?', with Jeffrey Mogil (Speaker); Jon-Kar Zubieta (Speaker), at the 2nd Joint Scientific Meeting of the American Pain Society and the Canadian Pain Society, Vancouver, B.C. on 6-9 May 2004.
  • Stuart Derbyshire, attended 'Imaging the brain: prospects and pitfalls', at Janssen Pharmaceutica Inc., 16 July 2004.
  • Stuart Derbyshire, attended 'Imaging the brain in pain', at the Portuguese Pain Society Annual Meeting, Lisbon, Portugal, 14- 16 October 2004.
  • Stuart Derbyshire, spoke on 'If it ain't broke how do we fix it? The challenge of functional pain', [[Institute

for Science and Technology in Medicine]], Keele University Medical School, UK, 25 October 2004.

  • Stuart Derbyshire, spoke on 'If it ain't broke how do we fix it? The challenge of functional pain', [[University

of Wales]], Bangor, Psychology Department 29 October 2004. 2005

  • Stuart Derbyshire, spoke on 'Imaging of cortical and pain control systems', Official IASP Satellite meeting – Visceral Pain, Adelaide, Australia, 17-19 August 2005.
  • Stuart Derbyshire, spoke on 'Sex, gender and human pain', IASP Meeting, Sydney, Australia, 21-25 August 2005.

Linda LeResche (Moderator); Anita Holdcroft (Speaker); Stuart Derbyshire (Speaker). 2006

  • Stuart Derbyshire, spoke on 'The brain in pain: Why does the ghost of Descartes still haunt us?', Plenary

presentation at the American Psychosomatic Society 64th Annual Meeting, Denver, March 1- 4, 2006.

2007

  • Stuart Derbyshire, 'Does pain from any source still feel the same?' at the University of Edinburgh, School of Psychology and Department of Neuroscience, 25 January 2007.
  • Stuart Derbyshire, spoke on 'Functional imaging of physically and psychologically induced pain in controls and functional pain patients', at GlaxoSmithKline, DuCane Road, London, 7 February 2007.
  • Stuart Derbyshire, 'Fetal pain: The evidence. International Conference on Second Trimester Abortion', The Institute of Physics, London, UK, 29-31 March 2007.
  • Stuart Derbyshire, spoke on 'Being hypnotisable increases pain experience during distraction but the label “hypnosis” reduces pain experience'. Derbyshire SWG with Hylands-White N, Jevons CJ, Stevenson E., at the British Society of Medical and Dental Hypnosis Conference. Novotel York, 10-13 May 2007.
  • Stuart Derbyshire organised the 'Social cognitive neuroscience symposium' with speakers: Guinote A, Humphreys G, Knoblich G, Sebanz N, and Van Vugt M. The British Psychological Society Social Psychology Section, University of Kent, 5-7 September 2007.

2008

  • Stuart Derbyshire, 'Does pain from any other source still feel the same?', University of Swansea, School of Medicine, 7 February, 2008.
  • Stuart Derbyshire, spoek at the 'Hypnosis: Theory and Therapy symposium' organised by Naish, P (organizer), & alongside Kirsch I, Gruzelier J, Liossi C. The British Psychological Society Annual Conference, Royal Dublin Society, 2-4 April 2008.
  • Stuart Derbyshire spoke on 'Gray matter volume in medial frontal and supplementary motor regions increases with hypnotisability' alongside Gianaros PJ, Whalley MG, Oakley DA, at the British Society of Medical and Dental Hypnosis Conference. Hilton Stansted, May 2008.
  • Stuart Derbyshire, 'How does the brain switch pain on and off?' SSNP Midlands, West Park Hospital, Wolverhampton, 2 June, 2008.
  • Stuart Derbyshire, 'Psychophysiological mechanisms of pain', RCA Regional Current topics Meeting, Novotel Birmingham, 4-6 June 2008.
  • Stuart Derbyshire, 'What goes up doesn’t always come down: The problem of chronic pain', GlaxoSmithKline, DuCane Road, London, 9 July 2008.

2011

2014

  • Stuart Derbyshire spoke on 'Stand up for Humanity and Put Neuroscience in its Place' at the Science Cafe on 18th September 2014[55]

TV and Radio Appearances

2009

  • Early 2009 - Stuart Derbyshire appeared on 'The One Show' with Michael Mosley, looking at 'the Power of Hypnosis', on the BBC[56].

2011

  • November 2011 - Stuart Derbyshire appeared on 'Derren Brown: 'The Experiments, Channel 4[57][58]

Publications

1990-1999

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000-2009

2001

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010-2019

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

Resources



Notes

  1. "Articles by Stuart Derbyshire", Spiked website, accessed 2 May 2010
  2. Stuart Derbyshire Curriculum Vita, Academia.edu Circa 2008
  3. All dates in this section are taken from either: Stuart Derbyshire ‘CV’, linkedin, accessed 17 March 2015 OR ‘Stuart Derbyshire – expert 729422’, ORC experts, accessed 17 March 2015.
  4. See Stuart Derbyshire, Staff profile, 3 September 2013, blog nus, accessed 18 March 2015.
  5. See 'about us', ORC Experts website, accessed 18 March 2015.
  6. See Stuart Derbyshire expert proffile, ORC Experts, accessed 18 March 2015.
  7. Based on a Nexis search of ‘'Stuart Derbyshire' AND 'Singapore' OR 'University' NOT 'Football', which returns 101 articles, of which 92 are the Derbyshire in question.
  8. For example see the Birmingham Post, 'Doctors want more mobile freedom', Midland Independent Newspapers plc, 13 October 2006.
  9. Stuart Derbyshire, 'Futures: Prozac and cons', Living Marxism, No. 68 - June 1994, p. 34.
  10. *Stuart Derbyshire, 'Futures: A turning point in Aids research?', Living Marxism, No. 85 - December 1995, p. 34.
  11. *Helene Guldberg and Stuart Derbyshire, 'Futures: No Natural Born Killers', Living Marxism, No. 80 - June 1995, p. 38.
  12. *Dr Stuart Derbyshire and James Heartfield, 'Futures Exchange: Do genes influence intelligence?', LM 102, p. 38, July/August 1997.
  13. *Dr Stuart Derbyshire, 'Taboos: Can a fetus feel pain?', Living Marxism, No. 93 - September 1996, p. 8.
  14. See WHO statistics accessed 23 December 2014.
  15. See Stuart Derbyshire Spiked 'Ignore the ‘plague’ panic – mankind is beating AIDS:We have pretty much tamed the AIDS virus. So why won’t we celebrate?', 10 December 2014, Spiked, accessed 23 December 2014.
  16. This is the latest date statistics are given for leading cause of death on the WHO's media centre factsheets, update May 2014, WHO, accessed 23 December 2014.
  17. A version of Stuart Derbyshire's CV from (circa) 2009 provides the majority of these dates. Where it has been possible to confirm the information in additon to his CV this has been indicated.
  18. See ‘Stuart Derbyshire – expert 729422’, ORC experts, accessed 17 March 2015.
  19. See ‘Stuart Derbyshire – expert 729422’, ORC experts, accessed 17 March 2015.
  20. See Stuart Derbyshire ‘CV’, linkedin, accessed 17 March 2015.
  21. See Stuart Derbyshire ‘CV’, linkedin, accessed 17 March 2015.
  22. See Stuart Derbyshire ‘CV’, linkedin, accessed 17 March 2015.
  23. See ‘Stuart Derbyshire – expert 729422’, ORC experts, accessed 17 March 2015.
  24. See Stuart Derbyshire ‘CV’, linkedin, accessed 17 March 2015.
  25. See ‘Stuart Derbyshire – expert 729422’, ORC experts, accessed 17 March 2015.
  26. He has been an associate editor since at least 2007. See Stuart Derbyshire speaker biography, 27 October 2007, Battle of Ideas, accessed 17 March 2015.
  27. See PAIN editorial board, ISAP, accessed 17 March 2015.
  28. See ‘Stuart Derbyshire – expert 729422’, ORC experts, accessed 17 March 2015.
  29. See ‘Stuart Derbyshire – expert 729422’, ORC experts, accessed 17 March 2015.
  30. See ‘Stuart Derbyshire – expert 729422’, ORC experts, accessed 17 March 2015.
  31. See ‘Stuart Derbyshire – expert 729422’, ORC experts, accessed 17 March 2015.
  32. See ‘Stuart Derbyshire – expert 729422’, ORC experts, accessed 17 March 2015.
  33. See ‘Stuart Derbyshire – expert 729422’, ORC experts, accessed 17 March 2015.
  34. See ‘Stuart Derbyshire – expert 729422’, ORC experts, accessed 17 March 2015.
  35. See ‘Stuart Derbyshire – expert 729422’, ORC experts, accessed 17 March 2015.
  36. See ‘Stuart Derbyshire – expert 729422’, ORC experts, accessed 17 March 2015.
  37. See 'Manchester Salon', Tuesday 14 July 2009, Institute of Ideas, accessed 12 March 2015.
  38. See ‘Stuart Derbyshire – expert 729422’, ORC experts, accessed 17 March 2015.
  39. His PhD was entitled: Neuropsychological Measures of Pain Processing in Pain Patients and Pain Free Volunteers: A Study Using Positron Emission Tomography and funded by the ESRC.
  40. See 'Ethics on trial', 30 October 2005, Battle of Ideas, accessed 27 January 2015.
  41. See ‘Human enhancement: creating superhumans or dicing with our destinies?’, 28 October 2006, Battle of Ideas, accessed 27 January 2015.
  42. See ‘CAM – junk science or genuine alternative?’, 27 October 2007, Battle of Ideas, accessed 27 January 2015.
  43. See: ‘Whose data is it anyway?’, 2 November 2008, Battle of Ideas, accessed 27 January 2015.
  44. See ‘The rise and rise of behavioural economics’, 16 May 2009, Battle of Ideas, accessed 27 January 2015.
  45. See ‘Nudge Nudge, Nag Nag: the new politics of behaviour’, 1 November 2009, Battle of Ideas, accessed 27 January 2015.
  46. See ‘What makes life sacred?’, 30 October 2010, Battle of Ideas, accessed 27 January 2015.
  47. See ‘Should apes have rights?’, 30 October 2010, Battle of Ideas, accessed 27 January 2015.
  48. See ‘Artificial intelligence, bionic men and human conciousness’, 25 October 2011, Battle of Ideas, accessed 27 January 2015.
  49. See [1], 29 October 2011, Battle of Ideas, accessed 27 January 2015.
  50. See ‘Is there a ghost in the machine?’, 30 October 2011, Battle of Ideas, accessed 27 January 2015.
  51. See ‘Smart drugs: magic bullet or cheating ourselves?’, 30 October 2011, Battle of Ideas, accessed 27 January 2015.
  52. See ‘Organ donation: dead or alive?’, 21 October 2012, Battle of Ideas, accessed 27 January 2015.
  53. See Center for Social and Economic Research, accessed 12 March 2015.
  54. See Stuart Derbyshire & Anthony Jones, [I feel your pain: human and animal suffering 'I feel your pain: human and animal suffering'], 24 September 2011, the Manchester Salon, accessed 18 March 2015.
  55. See Stuart Derbyshire, 'Science Café SG: Stand up for Humanity and Put Neuroscience in its Place', 18 September 2014, hey-event, accessed 18 March 2015.
  56. See 'the power of hypnosis', candotherapy, accessed 18 March 2015.
  57. See University of Birmingham News, 'Assassination under hypnotic suggestion: Stuart Derbyshire features on Derren Brown's The Experiments series', 3 November 2011, University of Birmingham website, accessed 18 March 2015.
  58. Also see Derren Brown, 'the experiments', episode 1, minute 11, Chanel 4 OD, accessed 18 March 2015.