Hizb ut-Tahrir

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Hizb ut-Tahrir is a transnational movement calling for the unification of Muslim countries into a single caliphate.[1]

Hizb ut-Tahrir was founded in 1953 by Taqiuddin an-Nabhani, an Islamic scholar and jurist in East Jerusalem, and most of its early members were Palestinians in neighbouring countries.[1] On his death in 1977, an-Nabhani was succeeded by Abdul Qadeem Zaloom. He in turn was succeeded on his death in 2003 by Ata Abu-l-Rushta.[1]

Hizb ut_Tahrir operates on a Leninist-style cell structure.[1] The group officially eschews violent methods, apparently on the grounds that only the caliph can declare jihad, but is reported to seek allies in national militaries.[1]

Hizb Ut-Tahrir Britain

The British branch of Hizb Ut-Tahrir was founded in 1986 by Omar Bakri Muhammad.[2]

Bakri was arrested in 1991 after saying that John Major was a legitimate target for assassination as a result of the Gulf War.[3] He was not charged over the incident.[4]

During the 1990s he supported the KLA in Kosovo.[5]

Bakri split from Hizb ut-Tahrir in 1996 to form Al-Muhajiroun with Anjem Choudary.[6]

Ex-Members

Former Members of Hizb -ut Tahrir have been prominent in the counter-extremism industry. Examples include:

Notes

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 Emmanuel Karagiannis & Clark McCauley (2006) Hizb ut-Tahrir al-Islami: Evaluating the Threat Posed by a Radical Islamic Group That Remains Nonviolent, Terrorism and Political Violence, 18:2, 315-334, DOI: 10.1080/09546550600570168.
  2. Hate Files: Hizb Ut-Tahrir, Hope Not Hate, accessed 10 May 2016.
  3. Mark Curtis, Secret Affairs: Britain's Collusion with Radical Islam, Serpent's Tale, 2010, p.273.
  4. Sean O'Neill and Daniel McGrory, The Suicide Factory: Abu Hamza and the Finsbury Park Mosque, HarperCollins, 2006, p.113.
  5. Mark Curtis, Secret Affairs: Britain's Collusion with Radical Islam, Serpent's Tale, 2010, p.245.
  6. Hate Files: Hizb Ut-Tahrir, Hope Not Hate, accessed 10 May 2016.