EN36

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This article is part of the Undercover Research Portal at Powerbase - investigating corporate and police spying on activists



Part of a series on
National Public Order Intelligence Unit
'EN36'
Male silhouette.png
Alias: unknown
Deployment: mid-2000s
Role:
undercover

EN36 is the cipher given to a former undercover officer of the National Public Order Intelligence Unit who was deployed for a short period in the mid-2000s. The Undercover Policing Inquiry has ruled that it will restrict real and cover name due to a 'real threat to life and limb'.[1][2]

As a police officer

Worked as a Test Purchasing Officer and completed the Advanced Undercover Course before joining the NPOIU.[3] They were deployed by the NPOIU for a short period in the mid-2000s, attending demonstrations.[4]

After leaving the NPOIU, they continued to do undercover work for the police, including one operation which poses a significant risk to the officers life. As of 2018 was still a serving police officer, and remained able to be deployed as an advanced undercover officer.[3] They also believe that revealing their identity would pose a risk to other undercovers and officers.[4]

They also stated:[4]

I cannot say for sure, however, I am almost certain that on the NUTAC course we were given assurances that our names and details would never be revealed. I had genuinely believed that I would always be protected in this country. I never envisaged any opportunity in which my identity would be revealed, in particular where the decision would be taken completely out of my hands.
Had I thought that there was any risk of what is now being considered by the Inquiry, I would not have agreed to become an undercover officer at all. My understanding has always been that everything would be done by the Constabulary who owned the job to avoid exposing that undercover officer.

Has stated that disclosure of their real / cover identities would place the officer and their family at risk of death or injury and if this happened they would feel the need to leave the country. They are also concerned they will be targeted by those they infiltrated and it would prevent them doing future undercover work.[3]

In Undercover Policing Inquiry

  • 2 May 2018: Mitting indicates he is minded to restrict the real and cover names for EN36[5], writing:[1]
EN36 belonged to the [NPOIU] for a short period in the mid-2000s. EN36 was engaged in legend building and established links with a group whose members almost certainly posed and pose no threat to the safety of EN36. EN36 has potentially significant evidence to give about the management of the [NPOIU], if at all possible in public. If so, protective measures will be required. EN36 is a serving police officer and has been deployed, undercover, in circumstances which give rise to a real threat to life and limb...
  • 30 October 2018: Mitting notes difficulties to be resolved in handling of evidence in relation to this officer's deployment and its management. However, Mitting ruled that the officers real and cover names will be restricted, noting: 'It is not possible to say more about the non-National Public Order Intelligence Unit deployment referred to in the application in this open ruling.[2]

Notes

  1. 1.0 1.1 Sir John Mitting, Applications for restriction orders in respect of the real and cover names of officers of the National Public Order Intelligence Unit and its predecessor/successor units 'Minded to' Note, Undercover Policing Inquiry, 2 May 2018.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Sir John Mitting, Applications for restriction orders in respect of the real and cover names of officers of the National Public Order Intelligence Unit and its predecessor/successor units Ruling 1 and 'Minded to' 2, Undercover Policing Inquiry, 30 October 2018.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 EN36 - Gisted summary of grounds of application, gisted version released by Undercover Policing Inquiry, 9 July 2018.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 Gisted witness statement of EN36, original dated 21 August 2017, gisted version released by Undercover Policing Inquiry, 9 July 2018.
  5. Steven Gray, Counsel to the Inquiry's Explanatory Note to accompany the Chairman's 'Minded To' Note 12 in respect of applications for restrictions over the real and cover name of officers of the National Public Order Intelligence Unit and its predecessor/successor units, Undercover Policing Inquiry, 2 May 2018.
  6. NPOIU 'Minded to' officer's list of documents - published 09 July 2018, Undercover Policing Inquiry, 9 July 2018. See also associated press note: Publication of documents relating to anonymity applications: National Public Order Intelligence Unit & Special Demonstration Squad, Undercover Policing Inquiry, 9 July 2018.
  7. Sir John Mitting, Applications for restriction orders in respect of real and cover names of officers of the Special Operations Squad and the Special Demonstration Squad and of the National Public Order Intelligence Unit - Directions, Undercover Policing Inquiry, 3 July 2018.