Terrorism and Political Violence

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First published in 1989 Terrorism and Political Violence (ISSN 0954-6553) is one of the two leading journals on terrorism, the other being Studies in Conflict and Terrorism. Both are published by Routledge part of the Taylor and Francis group, which is in turn part of the Informa Group which has helped to fund the Centre for the Study of Terrorism and Political Violence at St Andrews University.

About

Terrorism and Political Violence advances scholarship on a broad range of issues associated with terrorism and political violence, including subjects such as:

  • The political meaning of terrorist activity
  • Violence by rebels and by states
  • The links between political violence and organized crime
  • Protest
  • Rebellion
  • Revolution
  • The influence of social networks, and the impact on human rights.

Orientation

Terrorism and Political Violence has been strongly influenced by figures from the Centre for the Study of Terrorism and Political Violence at St Andrews University. Co-editor Alex Schmid is head of CSTPV, and associate editor Max Taylor is also a current CSTPV member. On the editorial board Bruce Hoffman and Paul Wilkinson are co-founders of CSTPV, whilst John Horgan and Rohan Gunaratna are also former CSTPV members.

In a 2005 article, British academics Jonny Burnett and Dave Whyte argue that:

The ‘terrorism’ that contributions to this journal focus on almost exclusively covers political violence directed against states, rather than by states. Where state terrorism does feature in analyses, it tends to be the political violence sponsored by states that are not allied to US or Western European countries (in other words, those described as ‘rogue states’). [1]

Burnett and Whyte argue that the inherent bias of the journal's research is not merely ideological but is the result of the research methodology employed by the experts associated with RAND and St Andrews. In particular they criticise the methodology employed in the compilation of the RAND-St Andrews database, which was published in the journal until it was discontinued.

Since the [RAND-St Andrews] chronology only records those incidents that are ‘international’, the database is orientated towards the recording of attacks on foreign visitors to, and military occupiers of, relatively poor countries. By definition those victims are normally business representatives and military personnel from economically strong, normally Western, nations. The second observation, which reinforces this latter point, is that the Chronology explicitly excludes acts of state terror committed by any government against its own citizens, and acts of violence occurring in war or in war-like situations. Incidents involving Western armies of occupation and businesses are included in the Chronology only where they are victims rather than the perpetrators of violence. Third, some of the methodological inconsistencies in the use of data in the Chronology database are reminiscent of the counter-insurgency position. It is possible to find non-violent activities and protests against state violence recorded in the database as ‘terrorism.’ [2]

People

Editorial Board circa 2014

Editors

Associate Editor

Assistant Editor

Reviews Editor

Editorial Board

Editorial board Circa 2008

Editors

Associate Editor

Assistant Editor

Reviews Editor

Editorial Board

Rogelio Alonso - King Joan Carlos University, Spain Kenneth Anderson - American University Law School, Washington, DC Michael Barkun - Syracuse University Ronald Crelinsten - University of Victoria, Canada Martha Crenshaw - Stanford University Adam Dolnik - University of Wollongong, Australia Rohan Gunaratna - Nanyang Technological University, Singapore Dipak Gupta - San Diego State University Bruce Hoffman - Georgetown University, Washington, DC John Horgan - Pennsylvania State University Jeffrey Kaplan - University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh Brig (Retd) Kiran Krishan - Institute of Defence Studies and Analyses, India Clark McCauley - Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania Ariel Merari - Tel Aviv University Abraham Miller - University of Cincinnati Fernando Reinares - Real Instituto Elcano and Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Madrid Marc Sageman - Foreign Policy Research Institute, Philadelphia, PA Todd Sandler - University of Texas, Dallas Harjit Sandhu - United Nations-ICTY Jeffrey D. Simon - Political Risk Assessment Co., Inc. Ekaterina Stepanova - Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) Leonard Weinberg - University of Nevada, Reno Paul Wilkinson - University of St. Andrews Amy Zegart - University of California, Los Angeles

Editorial board circa 1999

Editorial board

Kenneth Anderson, American University Law School | Abraham Miller, University of Cincinnati | John Murphy, Villanova University Law School | Michael Barkun, Syracuse University | Gerard Chaliand, Director of the Center for the Study of Conflicts (F.E.D.), Paris | Amos Perlmutter, The American University, Washington, DC | Ronald Crelinsten, University of Ottawa | Richard Rosecrance, University of California, Los Angeles | Martha Crenshaw, Wesleyan University, Connecticut | Alex Schmid, PIOOM Foundation, Leiden University | William Gutteridge, RISCT | Bruce Hoffman, The RAND Corporation, Washington, DC | Ehud Sprinzak, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem | Brian Jenkins | Joanne Wright, Magee University College, Northern Ireland | Juliet Lodge, University of Leeds[4]

Editorial board circa 1989


Notes

  1. Jonny Burnett & Dave Whyte, 'Embedded Expertise and the New Terrorism (PDF)', Journal for Crime, Conflict and the Media 1 (4) p.9
  2. Jonny Burnett & Dave Whyte, 'Embedded Expertise and the New Terrorism (PDF)', Journal for Crime, Conflict and the Media 1 (4) pp.9-10
  3. http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/journal.asp?issn=0954-6553&linktype=5
  4. (1999) Editorial board, Terrorism and Political Violence, 11:1, ebi-ebi, DOI: 10.1080/09546559908427491. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09546559908427491.
  5. (1989) Editorial board, Terrorism and Political Violence, 1:1, ebi-ebi, DOI: 10.1080/09546558908427007. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09546558908427007.