Rick Haythornthwaite

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Global warming.jpg This article is part of the Climate project of Spinwatch.
Rick Haythornthwaite is chairman of British energy company Centrica. He joined its board as a non-executive director in October 2013 and was appointed chairman in January 2014. [1]

He is an ex-oil executive for BP and Premier Oil.

Background

Accord to Centrica's website, Haythornthwaite:

has a wealth of knowledge in the energy industry. Rick has significant board experience, both as an executive and non-executive. He led the rescue of Invensys from 2001 to 2005 and the defence, turnaround and subsequent sale of Blue Circle Industries from 1997 to 2001. He spent his early career in various corporate, upstream and leadership positions in BP from 1978 to 1995, including exploration and production roles in the North Sea, Alaska, France and Venezuela before moving to Premier Oil as commercial director from 1995 to 1997. He has served on the boards of Network Rail as chairman and Cookson, Lafarge, ICI and Land Securities as non-executive director.

2008

According to an official biography in 2008: Haythornthwaite is a member of the board of trustees of the British Council, Chief Executive, Invensys plc. Haythornthwaite is also Chairman for the Risk and Regulation Advisory Council, partner at Star Capital Partners Limited, is Non Executive Chairman of the Board for Mastercard International, Chair of the Corporate Advisory Group for the Tate Gallery and Chair of the Board of Trustees for Almeida Theatre. He was previously Chairman of the Better Regulation Commission, Commercial Director of Premier Oil and Chief Executive of Blue Circle plc. Haythornthwaite began his career with BP.[2]

Views on fracking

FrackWell.png This article is part of the Spinwatch Fracking Portal and project
In 2013 Centrica spent £100m buying a 25 per cent share of fracking firm Cuadrilla 'sLancashire fracking operation and licence.

At Centrica's 2014 AGM Haythornthwaite told shareholders that fracking was a 'safe, environmentally sound' method of extracting oil and gas if done by the 'right operators', but acknowledged there were 'big questions about exactly where one should explore'. He insisted that the company had 'a conscience' over issues such as fuel poverty and fracking in sensitive areas, backing CEO Sam Laidlaw's view that national parks were 'not the place to start' the fledging industry. [3]

Affiliations

Notes

  1. Rick Haythornthwaite Chairman, Centrica website, undated, accessed 20 October 2014
  2. Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Rick Haythornthwaite Accessed 29th January 2008
  3. Emily Godson, won’t start fracking in national parks, says Centrica, The Telegraph, 12 May 2014