N officers 2

From Powerbase
Jump to: navigation, search


URG logo 1.png

This article is part of the Undercover Research Portal at Powerbase: investigating corporate and police spying on activists.



Part of a series on the
Undercover
Policing Inquiry
N Officers list
Description: A list of N & HN cyphers used to designate individual officers in the Inquiry and by Operation Herne (Part 2)

Police officers cited in the Undercover Policing Inquiry (UCPI) are generally designated by a cypher / nominal starting with N or HN followed by a number. The practice of assigning these cyphers was begun in by the Metropolitan Police inquiry Operation Herne which investigated the activities of the Special Demonstration Squad undercovers. It was subsequently adopted by Mark Ellison for his Review and the UCPI, both of which draw heavily on the material assembled by Operation Herne. The system appears to have changed in 2017, when the 3 August 2017 rulings and direction of the new Inquiry Chair, John Mitting, began using the 'HN' label, though the associated numbers appear to be unchanged.[1]

  • Updated 4 January 2018

N series officers part 2 (100-299)

Cypher Name Status Notes
HN101 unknown SDS. Contemporary of Peter Francis, who had 'an involvement in Stephen Lawrence campaign issues' according to Lambert (Ellison, p. 214).[2]
HN103 unknown 11 January 2018, directions issued for any application for restriction orders to be submitted by 30 & 31 January 2018 for MPS and Designated Lawyers Team respectively.[3]
HN104 Carlo Neri (alias) UCPI minded to restrict real name.[1][4] SDS UCO. Deployed against two groups March 2000 to Summer 2006. Both he and partners concerned about violence being used by (ex)members of the groups he targeted and of media intrusion, and the efforts of those with IT skills to ascertain his real name and whereabouts. "These concerns are not irrational and have some basis in fact". According to Prof Fox, (report of 8 March 2017), HN104 suffers from significant mental health conditions. Mitting opposing publishing of real name as interference under Article 8(2), and not necessary for those who claim sexual relationships with him in order to give evidence in acts committed by his cover name. "On the basis of what is known, interference in Article 8(2) rights is not justified." Can give evidence from behind a screen.[4] Applications from MPS & N104's lawyer to restrict publication of real name only; also received are personal statements from his family and expert medical report; final risk assessment from MPS awaited but no scope for restriction of cover name. Open versions published..[5]

In the responding submissions made by the Non-Police/State Core Participants, it was noted that Carlo's real name was known to those he had spied upon.[6] Mitting asked the NPSCPs to reconsider their position that HN104's real name should be released.[7] This was declined as no further material was forthcoming from the Inquiry [8] In his 23 October 2017 note, Mitting noted he could not prevent publication of the real name by others[7] The matter was returned to during the public hearing of 21 November when it effectively recognised that the name was going to be published, the matter simply being who did it. Mitting requested that the NPSCPs stayed their hand on releasing the real name until a closed hearing to consider management of the process.[9]

August 2017 application: open application for restriction order (MPS), open application for restriction order (S&G), Open supplementary application for restriction order (S&G), open medical assessment, open personal statement (1), open personal statement (2), open statement by HN104's partner, open statement by HN104's relative

HN106 unknown 11 January 2018, directions issued for any application for restriction orders to be submitted by 30 & 31 January 2018 for MPS and Designated Lawyers Team respectively.[3]
HN108 unknown real name to be published in due course.[1] No application made.[4] SDS back office / manager
HN109 unknown Minded-to: grant a restriction order for the real and cover name (15 Jan 2018).[10] SDS UCO & Det. Insp. SDS Detective Inspector in 1995.

Interview by Operation Herne quoted in Ellison Review: "There was never any reference made to ‘smearing’ in relation to the Lawrence family. Deployments into the support campaigns surrounding Stephen Lawrence were specifically to build a picture of the public order background… Any meeting I was involved in was never about any family member. It was done to protect the family" (Ellison, p.211).[2]

Mitting indicated on 15 January 2018 that he would grant a restriction over the real and cover name of HN109, the reasons for which would not be made public.[11]

Note: Extension sought to move consideration of their restriction order to a future tranche made in November 2017.[12]

N118 Simon Wellings (alias) Confirmed.[13] SDS UCO
HN120 unknown real name to be published in due course.[1] No application made.[4] SDS back office / manager
HN122 unknown 11 January 2018, directions issued for any application for restriction orders to be submitted by 30 & 31 January 2018 for MPS and Designated Lawyers Team respectively.[3]
HN123 unknown Ruling: restrict both cover name and real name.[14] SDS UCO. Deployed into a number of left-wing groups 1993-1998, one of which 'advocated and practiced teh use of violence'. Retired from MPS on health grounds & later diagnosed with a mental health condition in part derived from his deployment - in slow but incomplete recovery.[4][14] Said to have played a part in activities connected to the spying on the Lawrences, including by Peter Francis' barrister at the hearing of 21 November (Ms Sikand stated that the group HN123 infiltrated interacted with the Lawrences), but the extent to which that happened is disputed.[9][14]

In August 2017, Mitting indicated he was minded to restrict both the cover and real name of HN123:[1][4] "HN123 and HN123’s partner are concerned about the possibility that HN123’s identity will be revealed during the Inquiry, both for reasons of safety and because of the potential impact on HN123’s health. I have read personal statements by both of them, which are and will remain closed, in which these concerns are expressed. I accept that they are genuine and not irrational. Overriding them would interfere with their right to respect for private and family life under Article 8 of the European Convention and would require to be justified under Article 8(2). Fulfilment of the terms of reference of the Inquiry does not require that the real or cover name of HN123 be published. The evidence of HN123 can be given under a cypher. HN123 was involved indirectly in deployments affecting the Lawrence family and can give evidence about that under the cypher. To the extent that it is contentious, it can be challenged just as effectively, as if given in the real or cover name. In those circumstances, the interference would not be justified. It is desirable, and may be essential, that HN123 gives evidence in public. In that event, protective measures are likely to be required."[4]

An application was made by both the MPS & HN123's lawyer to restrict both cover and real names, accompanied with personal statements & medical material - of which open versions were published, some material having previously being released in March 2016.[5]

The restriction application was discussed at the hearing of 21 November where it was revealed that N123 was no longer a core participant and did not have legal representation. Mitting was concerned that if he did not give full anonymity to HN123 the officer would not cooperate with the Inquiry and it would not get a chance to hear their evidence, of importance given the potential connection to the spying on the Lawrences.[9] Mitting issuing his ruling on 5 December 2017, restricting publication of both real and cover names,. In this he acknowledged there was contention over the extent of HN123's role in spying on the Lawrences, but saying:[14]

On the factual premise that HN123's deployment only affected the Stephen Lawrence campaign peripherally and indirectly, it is not necessary for the fulfillment of the terms of reference of the Inquiry that his real or cover name should be published. If that premise proves to be wrong, I will have to revisit the issue.

The Restriction Order was made on 8 December 2017.

March 2016 application: open application, draft order, personal statement (gisted) & risk assessment (gisted).

August 2017 documents: open application for restriction order (MPS), open application for restriction order (S&G)


The Ellison review stated (p.211): N123... spoke on the telephone to Operation Herne in November 2013: "Francis was lying about the smearing of Lawrence…" N123 had taken over from Mr Francis when in the back office. Mr Francis had told him that it was their role to provide "gossip for the field…" N123 had spent nine months in the back office and amongst management and had gone to field meetings. Not once did N123 see or hear any instruction to 'smear' the Lawrences. He did not see any paperwork to reflect this either.

According to Bob Lambert (Ellison, p.214), N123 started his undercover work after Lambert had become head of the SDS and stated: I am sure from day one the Stephen Lawrence case would have been on N123’s agenda, and… they must have attended, started to attend meetings with the Stephen Lawrence campaign, almost goes as read that they would have been there… they would want to be inside the meeting, to have a speaker on the platform and so N123 is following close behind ‘Pete Francis’… they became quite close friends and times would have been at the same events… May well have been events specifically in support of the Stephen Lawrence campaign…

Mentioned in Herne II as being undercover with the potential to report on the Lawrence family (Herne II, 12.2).[15]


Represented by Slater & Gordon.

N124 unknown See under HN356; this officer was given two numbers by Operation Herne.[11]
N127 unknown Minded To (Nov 2017): refuse application for restriction of real name.[16] Sergeant with SDS 1997-2001. Provides statement where he states he does not recognise Peter Francis's statements regarding spying on the Lawrence family; also received Lambert's memo on the N81 / Walton meeting (Ellison, p.229). N81 told Ellison: …I was informed, at the height of the Macpherson inquiry, that my reporting was going straight to Sir Paul Condon’s desk each morning via N24, and N127 (SDS Sgt) passed on to me from N24 congratulations from the Commissioner for your excellent reporting…' (Ellison 212, 229 & 232).[2]

Note from Mitting (Nov 2017):[16]

Between 1997 and 2001 HN127 was a cover officer for deployed undercover officers, some of whose activities are likely to be the subject of detailed investigation by the Inquiry. With one significant proviso, addressed below, public investigation of HN127’s performance of his duties in his real name can be undertaken without posing a risk to HN127’s safety or interfering with the right to respect for private and family life of HN127. It is unavoidable, for reasons explained in the closed note which accompanies these reasons, that part of HN127’s evidence will be given in closed session.
N129 unknown Extension sought to be dealt with in a future tranche.[12] SDS Detective Sergeant. received Lambert's memo on the N81 / Walton meeting; commented on character and skill of Peter Francis, but also that they did not recognise the allegations regarding seeking information to smear the Lawrence family. His statement to Op. Herne is quoted in Ellison (p.212): "[Mr Francis] was targeted towards the campaign in the same way as today… to perform a dual role of protecting the family from malicious extremist influences and providing information about potential public order issues. The anti-police sentiment on the streets was palpable, and Territorial Policing was very interested in any potential or planned disorder…" N129 believes that he was directly tasked to get involved with the campaign, although not necessarily with the family. His role was not about ‘smearing’ at all.[2]
HN146 unknown Real name to be published in due course.[1] No application made.[4] SDS back office / manager
N183 Richard Walton Special Branch background. Later head of Counter Terrorism Command.
N190 unknown SDS Detective Inspector; commented on retention / destruction of documents within the SDS during a 2004 document rationalisation process (Ellison, 201).[2]
HN204 unknown Real name to be published in due course.[1] No application made.[4] SDS back office / manager
N216 unknown Minded-to (Nov 2017): application for restriction order in respect of real name to be refused.[16] SDS management. Responsible for day-to-day running of the unit in the 1990s.

Note from Mitting (Nov 2017):[16]

The evidence which he can give about the management of the Special Demonstration Squad is potentially significant. There is no known allegation of misconduct against him. He has identified no plausible risk to the safety or welfare of himself or his family beyond the possibility of unwelcome media attention if his whereabouts were to be traced. This is a real risk, but it is outweighed by the legitimate interest which the public has in his performance of his duty in a senior and responsible public office. The starting presumption that evidence given by such a person about such duties should be given publicly and in his own name is not displaced. Closed reasons accompany the note.

Expressed outrage at Peter Francis allegations (Herne II, 21.1.14) and stated in respect of the targeting of Duwayne Brooks (Herne 24.1.13): 'SDS activity targeting individuals in a public order context may have brought certain officers into contact with, or in the close proximity of Duwayne Brooks, but, if that did happen, this would not have been in response to the murder investigation, or any connection with the family'.[15]

N218 unknown Cover name and real name to be published as no restriction order application made.[12] Herne II, para. 25.1.2 states: The MPS Director of Intelligence in 1999 has been interviewed by Operation Herne and stated, 'I have been asked if I recall 'any Special Branch plans to mislead the Macpherson Inquiry' into the death of Stephen Lawrence. For part of this time, I was head of Special Branch operations and have no recollection of any such plans.’ Peter Francis alleged that N218 came out to see him in respect of withholding information from the Macpherson Inquiry. In interview, N218 stated that this meeting or request never happened.[15] It is not clear if N218 is the MPS Director of Intelligence referred to or if it refers to someone else entirely. If N218 is the Director of Intelligence then it is probably Alan Fry as opposed to his successor Roger Pearce (who appears as N85).[15]
HN241 unknown Minded-to (Nov 2017): neither cover or real name can be published.[16] The Restriction order application is listed to be heard in open hearing on 5 February 2018.[17] SDS UCO. In his 70s, deployed against one group in the early 1970s. No allegation of misconduct.

Mitting stated (Nov 2017):[16]

Although the risk to physical safety, if the real name were to be published, is low, it cannot be dismissed as fanciful. There is a real, but unquantifiable, risk that if the cover name were to be published, the real name could be identified. From what has so far been disclosed to the Inquiry about the deployment, it seems very unlikely that the publication of either real or cover name would prompt any evidence from a non—state source which would assist the Inquiry to fulfil its terms of reference. In those circumstances, the right to respect for an aspect of private life – physical integrity – is not outweighed by any factor which would justify interference with it. Closed reasons accompany this note.

Further documents published 4 January 2018: Open application for restriction order, Open risk assessment, Open impact statement.

HN241's Risk Assessment reveals that he is not a Core Participant in the Inquiry, and that he was not made any assurances regarding anonymity and nothing official was ever said regarding future anonymity. During employment N241 was arrested but not charged. Also he 'was the subject of one or more compromises, including an occasion when N241 avoided a threat of violence'.

Their Impact Statement speaks of the lack of support with the infiltration, calling the tasking 'amateurish'. HN241 also says:

There was no recognition from the SDS about welfare. (...) it was a matter of luck as to whether people recruited to the SDS could hack it. There were no checks on mental suitability for the role.
HN244 unknown Full extent of restriction order being sought unknown; extension sought for MPS to supply this application (Nov 2017).[12]
N275 unknown Det. Ch. Insp.; probably SDS but not definitive. Critical of record retention and note-taking in the SDS (Ellison, pages 198 & 201).[2]
HN294 unknown Ruling (December 2017): real name cannot be published.[14] Cover name not ascertained by UCPI.[1] SDS UCO & managerial. Now deceased. Deployed in 1968-1969 against one group which no longer exists, and reported on others, which also no longer exist. Managerial position in SDS 1969-1974, though the nature of this is not established (see below, January 2018). Has elderly widow & other family members.[14][4]

An application was made by the MPS to restricting real name, submitted along with evidence from family and a risk assessment - of which open versions were published in August 2017.[5]

In his 'Minded-to' (Aug 2017), Mitting said that he was intended to restrict the real name, noting:[4]

There is no risk to their safety and minimal risk of intrusive interest in them even if his real name were to be published. They wish to avoid that risk. Although the risk is minimal, nothing would be gained by running it. Unless HN294’s cover name were to become known, publication of his real name could not prompt evidence from one or more members of the affected groups. Evidence about his managerial role, if it is available, can be given by others who knew him, by reference to his cypher. In those circumstances, interference with the right of his widow and family to respect for their private life under Article 8 of the European Convention would not be justifiable under Article 8(2).

August 2017 application: Open application for restriction order, open risk assessment (Brian Lockie), open personal statement (1), open personal statement (2)

The application was heard at the hearing of 21 November 2017,[9] with Mitting ruling in favour of restricting the real name on 5 December. The grounds for the ruling were intereference with the rights of the widow (a family member had written on her behalf) despite their being 'no risk to the safety of his widow and family and minimal risk of intrusive media interest in them if his real name were to be published)'. He also said the submission that the chance the public being able to provide details of HN294's time undercover if they had his real name was 'fanciful', so the real name was not needed to fulfil the Inquiry's terms of reference.[14] The Restriction Order was issued on 8 December 2017.

Documents published 4 January 2018: HN294 is mentioned in Risk Assessment of N348, as one of two officers likely to have recruted her to the SDS in 1971 (with Phil Saunders, N1251).[18]

HN297 Rick Gibson (alias) Cover name released[1] Minded-To: real name cannot be published.[4] SDS UCO. Deceased. Deployed 1974-1976. "As in the case of the living officers cited above it is unlikely that the publication of his real name would prompt the giving or production of evidence necessary to permit the Inquiry to fulfil its terms of reference. It would be likely to interfere with the right of his widow."[4] The MPS have submitted an application to restrict his real name, along with a risk assessment (Graham Walker) and additional threat assessments - open versions published along with cover name.[5]

The application was heard at the hearing of 21 November 2017, where it was brought to the Inquiry's attention there was credible information that HN297 had conducted several relationships while undercover. Mitting noted this changed things, and asked for further information from the non-police/state core participants before making his ruling.[9][14] An application for core participancy by Richard Chessum, whom Gibson had spied upon and was able to provide information on said relationships, was accepted by Mitting on 5 December 2017.[19]

HN296 unknown 15 Jan 2018: 'Minded-to' grant restriction order over real name; no application in relation to cover name which will be published in due course.[10] SDS UCO. Currently in late 60s. Deployed against one left wing group from 1975 to 1978; no known allegation of misconduct against him.[11]

He does not live in the UK but is willing to cooperate with the Inquiry. Publication of real name 'not necessary to permit the terms of reference of the Inquiry to be fulfilled' as it would interfere with his right to respect for his private and family life, and would not be justified under article 8'.[11]

HN298 unknown Minded-to (Nov 2017): Real name cannot be published.[16] SDS UCO. Deployed against two groups in the 1970s, one of which was involved in anti-apartheid campaigning:[16]
In the course of his deployment, he was arrested at a demonstration against the British Lions rugby tour to South Africa on 12 May 1972 for obstruction of the highway and of a police officer. He was prosecuted in summary proceedings in his cover name. He was convicted of both offenses and fined and made the subject of a conditional discharge. His actions were approved by his line management. Not long after his deployment, he left the police service, since when he has had nothing to do with the police.

No application made for his cover name to be restricted. Regarding his application to have his real name restricted, Mitting noted:[16]

It is possible that, if his cover name is published, members of the groups against whom he was deployed will remember him and be able to give evidence about him. For that to happen, it is not necessary that his real name should be published. He has politely declined to cooperate with the Metropolitan Police risk assessor. In consequence, the Inquiry does not know whether he wishes to protect his real name. If he were to do so, and no new information adverse to him were to emerge, the interference with right to respect for his private life under Article 8(2) of the European Convention which would be occasioned by publication of his real name would not be justified. For the time being, on the application of the Metropolitan Police Service, his real name should not be published. This decision will be reviewed when he has made his own position clear.

Notes

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 Press Release: 'Minded to' note, ruling and directions in respect of anonymity applications relating to former officers of the Special Demonstration Squad, Undercover Policing Public Inquiry (UCPI.org.uk), 3 August 2017 (accessed 3 August 2017).
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 Mark Ellison, Possible corruption and the role of undercover policing in the Stephen Lawrence case, Stephen Lawrence Independent Review, Vol. 1, Gov.UK, March 2014
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 Applications for restriction orders in respect of the real and cover names of officers of the Special Operations Squad and the Special Demonstrations Squad: Directions, Undercover Policing Inquiry, 11 January 2018 (accessed 11 January 2018).
  4. 4.00 4.01 4.02 4.03 4.04 4.05 4.06 4.07 4.08 4.09 4.10 4.11 4.12 John Mitting, In the matter of section 19(3) of the Inquiries Act 2005 Applications for restriction orders in respect of the real and cover names of officers of the Special Operations Squad and the Special Demonstrations Squad ‘Minded to’ note, Undercover Policing Public Inquiry (UCPI.org.uk), 3 August 2017 (accessed 5 August 2017).
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 David Barr & Kate Wilkinson, Counsel to the Inquiry's explanatory note to accompany the 'Minded to' note in respect of applications for restrictions over the real and cover names of officers of the Special Operations Squad and the Special Demonstration Squad, Undercover Policing Public Inquiry (UCPI.org.uk), 3 August 2017 (accessed 5 August 2017).
  6. Ruth Brander & Philippa Kaufmann QC, Submissions on behalf of the non-police, non-state core participants re the Chairman's 'Minded To' note dated 3 August 2017 concerning restriction order applications, 5 October 2017 (accessed via UCPI.org.uk).
  7. 7.0 7.1 Sir John Mitting, Supplementary 'Minded-To', Undercover Policing Inquiry, 23 October 2017 (accessed 23 October 2017 via UCPI.org.uk).
  8. Ruth Brander & Philippa Kaufmann QC, Submissions on behalf of the non-police, non-state core participants re the Chairman's 'Minded To' note dated 23 October 2017 concerning restriction order applications, 6 November 2017 (accessed via UCPI.org.uk).
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 9.3 9.4 Transcript of hearing of 21 November 2017, Undercover Policing Inquiry, 21 November 2017.
  10. 10.0 10.1 Press notice - ‘Minded-to’ anonymity: Special Demonstration Squad Officers (HN13, HN296, HN304, HN339, HN340, HN354, HN356/124, HN61, HN819, HN109, HN9, HN66), Undercover Policing Inquiry, 15 January 2018 (accessed 15 January 2018).
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.3 Sir John Mitting, Applications for restriction orders in respect of the real and cover names of officers of the Special Operations Squad and the Special Demonstration Squad: 'Minded to' note 3, Undercover Policing Inquiry, 15 January 2018 (accessed 15 January 2018).
  12. 12.0 12.1 12.2 12.3 Counsel to the Inquiry's Explanatory note to accompany the 'Minded-To' Note (2) in respect for restrictions over the real and cover names of officers of the Special Operations Squad and the Special Demonstration Squad, Undercover Policing Inquiry, 14 November 2017 (accessed 15 November 2017).
  13. Update on anonymity applications – N118 ("Simon Wellings"), Undercover Policing Public Inquiry (UCPI.org.uk), 19 January 2017 (accessed 5 August 2017).
  14. 14.0 14.1 14.2 14.3 14.4 14.5 14.6 14.7 Sir John Mitting, Applications for restriction orders in respect of the real and cover names of officers of the Special Operations Squad and the Special Demonstration Squad: Ruling, Undercover Policing Inquiry, 5 December 2017 (accessed 9 December 2017).
  15. 15.0 15.1 15.2 15.3 Mick Creedon, Operation Herne: Report 2 - Allegations of Peter Francis, Metropolitan Police Service, March 2014.
  16. 16.0 16.1 16.2 16.3 16.4 16.5 16.6 16.7 16.8 In the matter of section 19 (3) of the Inquiries Act 2005 Applications for restriction orders in respect of the real and cover names of officers of the Special Operations Squad and the Special Demonstrations Squad ‘Minded to’ note 2, Undercover Policing Inquiry, 14 November 2017 (accessed 15 November 2017)
  17. [15 January 2018 Press notice: Hearing on restriction orders in respect of HN23, HN40, HN241, HN322 and HN348], Undercover Policing Inquiry, 15 January 2018 (accessed 15 January 2018).
  18. Graham Walker, N348 - Risk Assessment, Metropolitan Police Service, 17 July 2017 (accessed 5 January 2018
  19. Sir John Mitting, Core Participants Ruling 15: Richard Chessum, Undercover Policing Inquiry, 4 December 2017.