Joint Warfare Establishment

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The Joint Warfare Establishment was a unit of the British Military based between 1963 and 1979 at a former RAF base at Old Sarum. A report in the Flying Review in 1963 notes that School of Land Air Warfare 'has been such a great success that it is soon to enlarge the scope of its activity by amalgamating with the Amphibious Warfare School, at Poole, Dorset, to become the Joint Warfare Establishment.[1] According to an unofficial RAF website the JWE was 'Formed 31 Mar 1963' and was 'Disbanded 22 Jul 1976.'[2]

It was the home of British psyops training from at least 1970. In March 1979, according to Roger Faligot, the JWE moved to Latimer, Buckinghamsire 'near the National Defence College'[3]

People

Commandants

Psyops staff

Notes

  1. BRITAIN'S WAR SCHOOL School of Land-Air Warfare at RAF Old Sarum assigned new and important role. Flying Review April 1963, accessed 15 June 2010
  2. Air of Authority - A History of RAF Organisation Other Establishments - Experimental and Administrative, accessed 15 June 2010
  3. Roger Faligot, Britain's Military Strategy in Ireland: the Kitson Experiment, Brandon/Zed 1983, p. 64
  4. Air of Authority - A History of RAF Organisation Other Establishments - Experimental and Administrative, accessed 15 June 2010
  5. Air of Authority - A History of RAF Organisation Other Establishments - Experimental and Administrative, accessed 15 June 2010
  6. Air of Authority - A History of RAF Organisation Other Establishments - Experimental and Administrative, accessed 15 June 2010
  7. Rear-Admiral Teddy Gueritz, Daily Telegraph, Obituaries, Published: 7:33PM GMT 06 Jan 2009
  8. Air of Authority - A History of RAF Organisation Other Establishments - Experimental and Administrative, accessed 15 June 2010
  9. Air Vice-Marshal Freddie Hazlewood, Daily Telegraph, Obituaries, Published: 12:01AM BST 30 Jul 2007
  10. Royal Marine (RM) Officers 1939-1945, accessed 15 June 2010
  11. Faligot appears to mistakenly list his surname as 'Owns': Roger Faligot, Britain's Military Strategy in Ireland: the Kitson Experiment, Brandon/Zed 1983, p. 64
  12. Roger Faligot, Britain's Military Strategy in Ireland: the Kitson Experiment, Brandon/Zed 1983, p. 64