Family Education Trust

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The new logo of the Family Education Trust which replaced the logo originally developed for Family and Youth Concern (see below) in late 2011 or early 2012.[1]

Family Education Trust is a conservative moral campaign organisation created in 1971 and at first called the Responsible Society and then Family and Youth Concern.[2]

Contents

Orientation

The original logo of the Family Education Trust and of its predecessor Family and Youth Concern. The logo is notable as an idealised representation of the Western nuclear family

Conservative connections

The Trust (which from 2000-2011 referred to its former name in brackets as Family Education Trust (Family & Youth Concern)) describes itself as ‘a national educational trust which researches the causes and consequences of family breakdown.’ It states that it has ‘no political or religious affiliations'. [2] However, academic researchers describe it variously as one of a number of ‘moralist lobbies’, [3] ‘moral crusading organisations’[4], ‘moral conservative’ or ‘moralist organisations’[5][6]. The Trust can be seen as a strongly conservative organisation, informed by conservative Christian views on the family and sexuality.

It is clear that moral conservative views are not confined to a particular political party. However, it is also true that there are multiple connections between the Trust and both the Conservative Party and the conservative movement more broadly. These connections seem not to be as dense with other political parties. Connections to the Tory Party include the late Janet Young, the late Diana Elles, Detta O'Cathain and James Graham the 8th Duke of Montrose who sat/sit on the conservative benches in the House of Lords.

Connections to the conservative movement include:

Religious, specifically Christian, orientation

It has been noted that F&YT, unlike organisations such as CARE or the Conservative Family Campaign, ‘sought to avoid an overtly religious language’.[13] Nevertheless, the Trust is notably aligned with the Christian faith as are many of the leading moral conservative groupings in the UK. For example:

  • Trustee Trevor Stammers was Chair of the Christian Medical Fellowship between 2007 and 2009.[14]
  • The 'spiritual journey to Rome'[15] taken by Valerie Riches and Denis Riches was more than simply a personal religious conversion but was carried over into all their work including in Family and Youth Concern and Family Publications. The latter published some of the 'books, research reports and booklets' of Family and Youth concern and in the 1990s 'imported papal documents and began publishing English editions of new papal documents as they were issued, together with books for the Pontifical Council of the Family, with whom Valerie was working on family issues.'[16]
  • Sponsor Detta O'Cathain is also a patron of the Christian Institute a British evangelical Christian pressure group that aims, according to its filings with the Charity Commission, 'to promote Christian influence in a secular world'. [17] In 2008 it was reported that she also sponsored a parliamentary pass for the Christian Institute.[18]
  • Clifford Hill was among the signatories of Westminster 2010, a declaration intended "to appeal to UK Christians of all denominations who subscribe to the historic Christian faith and who hold orthodox Christian beliefs about life, marriage and conscience."[19] In 2000 Hill wrote a book for the Family Education Trust.[20]
  • Former sponsor Baroness Young, a 'fervent political advocate of the moral crusade for traditional family values'[21] was well-known for her strong Christian faith and ideals. Founder President Valerie Riches describes Young as a 'valued advisor' to the Trust until Young died in 2002.[22] Young was also Patron of the evangelical Christian Institute until her death.[23]
  • Executive committee member Ann Allen is a Christian activist and a former convenor of the Church of Scotland's Board of Social Responsibilities. [24]
  • Patron Viscountess Brentford (Gillian Joynson-Hicks) and her husband Viscount Brentford are on the evangelical wing of the church and opposed the ordination of the openly gay canon, Dr Jeffrey John, as Bishop of Reading.[25] According to the Telegraph, Joynson-Hicks was 'a close friend of Dr Carey and his wife Eileen, she is said to have enormous influence with the Archbishop'[26] The Telegraph claims: 'Lady Brentford is said by some to be "Carey's fixer".'[26] Joynson-Hicks has also been 'president of the evangelical Church Mission Society.'[26]

Moralism

Moralism or moral politics can be defined in a number of ways. The first is in the dictionary sense: ‘one concerned with regulating the morals of others’.[27] The second is in the more political sense of those views that attribute social problems associated with marriage breakdown, single parent families, illicit drug use, the sex industry as moral problems - part of the problem of the 'permissive society' which are susceptible to moral solutions, though these might be enforced by the state. Moralists often oppose solutions to social problems that would reduce harm, save lives, increase population health and or equity and justice especially if these solutions go against their abstract moral precepts. Moral conservatives often describe their views as encapsulating 'family values' or a defence of the 'traditional family'. Such terms are well known descriptors of the moral conservative outlook.

Thus the Family Education Trust director Norman Wells has described opposition to homosexuality in moral, Christian terms. In a press release opposing the Equality Act (Sexual Orientation) Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2006, Wells noted that:

The regulations imply that moral opposition to homosexual activity represents a failure to respect those who experience same-sex attraction when, in reality, it is perfectly possible to show respect for the dignity and worth of individuals who are attracted to another person of the same sex without wishing to give the appearance of condoning, approving or advocating homosexual practices.[28]

Underlying this approach is the fact, according to Wells that ‘homosexual conduct goes against the created order’ - a strong clue to the religious basis of the Trust's values. Denying that this approach is homophobic Wells notes that this is because the 'fears' of many are 'entirely rational and not at all unreasonable'.[28]

History

The Trust was founded in 1971 ‘by the late Stanley Ellison, a London GP specialising in preventative medicine.’[2]

After writing a letter to The Times, Ellison ‘was contacted by people who shared his concern that the breakdown of the traditional family could have long-lasting and serious consequences'. Thus was the Responsible Society born. It later changed its name to Family and Youth Concern.

Ellison was concerned about the effects of the ‘permissive society’ and in particular what the Trust describes as ‘significant changes in both laws and social attitudes in such areas as divorce, having children outside of marriage, abortion and pornography.’[2] The Trust claims that it is not ideological but rather ‘research-based’. ‘There is no area in social science in which the evidence stacks up so completely on one side’, it claims: ‘marriage and traditional family life are associated with good outcomes in terms of health, wealth and other indicators of well-being.’[2]

The approach of the Trust pulls against the economic tenets of neoliberalism which promotes freedom in the market. It argues that ‘unfortunately, the view that people should be free to make their own choices, without having to accept any adverse consequences, dominates the public policy agenda.’ [2]

Other founding executives of the Responsible Society included Ronald Butt, Associate Editor of the Times; David Holbrook, the humanist author and poet; and Graham Heath, a Quaker and General Secretary of the Youth Hostel Association. Patrons included Sir John Peel, the Queens Gynaecologist and Lord Shawcross. Graham Heath was succeeded as Honorary Secretary by Valerie Riches.[29]

The title the 'Responsible Society' was changed, because it 'soon evoked mockery in the media'. According to Valerie Riches 'the title seemed to be distracting from what we were saying' and it was changed to Family and Youth Concern.[29]

Activities

The Trust produces ‘publications, newsletters, videos, submissions to public enquiries’ and acts as ‘a point of contact for the media’ as well as producing ‘material for use in schools, much of which can be downloaded free from our website [2]’ and acts ‘in defense of the traditional family’(sic). [2]

The Trust is pro-family, pro-marriage and makes strong pronouncements in both the press and on its website about the problems it believes originate from a ‘permissive society’, from sex before marriage, to cohabition, to the morning-after-pill.[30] It argues that successive governments, including the Coalition, ‘continue to pursue policies that undermine and marginalise parents’.

Public policy has progressively undermined the ability of parents to care for their own children. Young people, including children under the legal age of consent to sexual intercourse, are being provided with contraceptives and then treated for the outcomes of sexual relationships by means of abortion and sexually transmitted disease clinics, without their parents ever having to be informed. [2]

HIV and AIDS

Like other moral conservative groups Family and Youth Concern viewed HIV and AIDS as at least partly the result of the 'permissive society'. One summary of the moralist position on the AIDS crisis of the late 1980s stated[31]:

For those involved in conservative moral politics AIDS appeared to be quite literally a godsend which provided an opportunity to go on the offensive against 'permissiveness'. Numerous Conservative backbenchers, religious leaders and others took up the cudgels in the mid-1980s characterising AIDS as the wages of sine. Campaigners fro the moral right asserted that the only way of avoiding AIDS was heterosexuality, chastity and monogamy. James Anderton, the chief constable of Greater Manchester who claimed he had a direct line to God, infamously declared that people with HIV or AIDS were 'swirling around in a human cesspit of their own making'.[32] Sir Rhodes Boyson, MP and former Education Minister, blamed gay men for spreading AIDS and asserted the were flouting God's law. 'AIDS', he said, 'is part of the fruits of a permissive society' and he suggested that AIDS would die out 'if we could wipe out the homosexual practices'.[33]
Conservative moralists identified both media coverage of AIDS and health edcation materials as part of the problem. The Health Education Authority (HEA) was seen to have been infiltrated by liberals and to have succumbed to the insidious influence of 'the homosexual lobby'. AIDS information materials were criticised for using 'extraordinarily bad language', and because they 'virtually ignored the virtues of monogamy or abstinence'.[34]
In late 1986, a group of Roman Catholic bishops accused the BBC of encouraging teenagers to 'sleep around'. The bishops condemned the 'play safe' slogan of the Radio One AIDS helpline service and said 'the BBC's message that sex using a condom is acceptable' was 'morally wrong'. The Anglican Bishop of Birmingham also denounced the campaign declaring: 'Sex is not about playing. It is a very deep and important experience. chastity is the only safe answer to AIDS'.[35]
...Moralist pressure groups such as Family and Youth Concern and the Conservative Family Campaign also protested against media coverage and the government campaign on similar grounds.[36] Family and Youth Concern for example produced a video as an antidote to the government campaign which emphasised chastity and was entitled The Truth About AIDS.

Sex education campaigns

The Trust campaigns vigorously on the issue of sex education in schools, which it describes ‘an ideological battlefield on which a war is being waged for the hearts and minds of children’. It argues that ‘behind the innocuous sounding words of the sex education lobby, there is a definite agenda at work to undermine the role of parents and to tear down traditional moral standards’. [37] [38] In 2011 the Trust carried out a national survey, which it argued ‘reveals’ how the UK Healthy Schools Programme ‘is being used as a vehicle to impose a liberal and permissive type of sex education on pupils in many parts of the country’.[39]

The Trust advocates abstinence education as one solution, and in recent years has distributed leaflets to all secondary schools in England on the merits of saving sex for marriage, warning that sex before marriage is ‘ugly and destructive and will lead to misery and regret’. [40] It has also worked with and promotes the views of abstinence groups such as Challenge Teams, with whom it is a founder member of the Sex and Relationships Education Council, an umbrella body representing sex and relationship education providers launched in Parliament in May 2011.[41]

Relations with other moral conservative groups

The Trust has personnel links with a range of other moral and religious organisations as noted above. Other links, relations or support include the Morality Forum which says it supports 'other moral groups such as Family and Youth Concern'. [42] According to press reports the Morality Forum is 'part of the Unification Church commonly known as the "Moonies"'.[43] There is no evidence that the Family Education Trust reciprocates this support.

The Trust is part of the Coalition for Marriage (C4M), a British umbrella pressure group opposing moves to redefine traditional marriage, set up in December 2011 ahead of a government consultation in 2012. Trust director Norman Wells sits on the board of C4M alongside directors from the Christian Institute, Evangelical Alliance, Christian Legal Centre and CARE.[44]

It is also a founding member of the Sex and Relationships Education Council, an 'umbrella body representing sex and relationship education providers' launched in Parliament in May 2011 and endorsed by education minister Michael Gove. Other founding members include Evaluate, Lovewise, Challenge Teams, LIFE, Silver Ring Thing and Right to Life. [45]

Funding

The Trust says that it ‘is funded entirely by voluntary donations’, taking no ‘government funding, directly or indirectly.’ [2]

In the year ending 31 Dec 2010 the Trust had an income of £164,179 and expenditure of £88,607.

Charitable status

The Trust was first registered as a Charity (No.266382) on 11 October 1973. According to Charity Commission records, this was under the name of the Responsible Society Research and Education Trust, and then later as the Family Education Trust, which operated until 30 June 1999 when it 'ceased to exist'. The Trust's original charitable objectives were 'to carry out or promote research into the social, medical, economic and psychological consequences of sexual behaviour and to publish the results of such research'. [46]

In 1999 a 'new' charity called the Family Education Trust was registered with the Commission. (Charity no.1070500).Its founding principles included a second objective to the one outlined above. This was 'to establish, carry out and promote research into the family founded on marriage; and to publish and disseminate the information and data obtained therefrom.[47]

By 2000 the Trust reportedly had over 2000 members. [48]

Grants issued

The Trust funded the research for a CIVITAS publication by Rebecca O'Neill in 2005 on 'Fiscal Policy and the Family: How the Family Fares in France, Germany and the UK'. It included a foreword by John Haskey.[49]

People

Current

  • Valerie Riches - Founder President and trustee, also served as Director until 2000 [50]
  • Norman Wells - Director
  • Robert Whelan served as FET's director from 2000 until 2004, and was a member of its Executive Committee for many years beforehand. In his outgoing director's report in 2004 Whelan said that his 'appointment as Director had been a serendipitous idea of Valerie Riches and had not been intended as a permanent one. He had enjoyed and valued the work which he had been able to combine with his work for Civitas to the benefit of both organisations. He praised the work of his former assistant, now Director, Norman Wells'. Whelan continues his association with FET as a trustee. [51]

Trustees 2012

Arthur Cornell MEd, F.Coll.P (Chairman); Betty, Lady Grantchester; Dr John Guly MB BS DMJ; Eric Hester BA (Vice Chairman); Simon J Ling MA FCA (Hon Treasurer); Denis Riches BSc (Secretary); Valerie Riches (Founder President); Dr Trevor Stammers BSc FRCGP DRCOG, DPAB; Robert Whelan MA[52]

Sponsors 2012

Professor John Bonnar MA MD FRCOG; The Viscountess Brentford OBE; Peter Dawson OBE BSc FRSA; The Baroness Elles; The Duke of Montrose; The Baroness O'Cathain OBE; Professor Dennis O'Keeffe [52]

Executive Committee Members circa 2011

Ann Allen, Sarah Carter, Anna Lines, Gillian White, Fiona Wyatt

Former personnel

Trustees circa 2010

Arthur Cornell MEd, F.Coll.P (Chairman); Betty, Lady Grantchester; Dr John Guly MB BS DMJ; Eric Hester BA (Vice Chairman); Simon J Ling MA FCA (Hon Treasurer); Denis Riches BSc (Secretary) - he passed away 2007, though remains on the website as a trustee; Valerie Riches(Founder President); Dr Trevor Stammers BSc FRCGP DRCOG, DPAB; Robert Whelan MA (former Director of FET, 2000-04)[2]

Sponsors circa 2010 and 2011

Professor John Bonnar MA MD FRCOG; The Viscountess Brentford OBE; Peter Dawson OBE BSc FRSA; Baroness Elles (sponsored FET from 1990 until her death in October 2009)[53]; The Duke of Montrose; Baroness O'Cathain OBE; Professor Dennis O'Keeffe [2] Professor Brenda Almond (circa 2011) Michael McKenzie (circa 2011) [54]

Executive Committee 2009, 2010 and 2011

An Executive Committee, which includes all the Trustees, manages the Trust. All the members of the Executive Committee are members of the Company but have no beneficial interest. Trustees and members of the Executive Committee are elected at the Annual General Meeting of the Company and may serve for three years without being re-elected. In addition to the Trustees, the following are members:

Ann Allen | Mrs Sarah Carter | Anna Lines | Gillian White | Mrs Fiona Wyatt [55] [56]

Trustees 2007

Arthur Cornell MEd, F.Coll.P (Chairman); Betty, Lady Grantchester; Dr John Guly MB BS DMJ; Eric Hester BA (Vice Chairman); Simon J Ling MA FCA (Hon Treasurer); Denis Riches BSc (Secretary); Valerie Riches (Founder President); Dr Trevor Stammers BSc FRCGP DRCOG, DPAB; Robert Whelan MA[57]

Sponsors 2007

Professor John Bonnar MA MD FRCOG; The Viscountess Brentford OBE; Peter Dawson OBE BSc FRSA; The Baroness Elles; The Duke of Montrose; The Baroness O'Cathain OBE; Professor Dennis O'Keeffe [57]

Trustees circa 2005

Arthur Cornell MED, F.Coll.P; Betty, Lady Grantchester; Dr John Guly MB, BS, DMJ; Eric Hester BA; Simon J Ling MA FCA (Hon Treasurer); Denis Riches BSc (Secretary); Valerie Riches; Dr Trevor Stammers BSc, MRCGP, DRCOG, DPAB; Robert Whelan, MA Cantab[58]

Sponsors circa 2005

Professor John Bonnar MA MD FRCOG; Peter Dawson OBE BSc FRSA; Baroness Elles of Westminster; Professor Dennis O'Keeffe MA PhD; Sir John Peel KCVO FRCS FRCP; J S Scott MD FRCS FRCOG[58]

Trustees 2004

'Those third of the trustees who retired by rotation were re-elected: Betty Lady Grantchester, Mr Denis Riches and Dr Trevor Stammers.'[59]

Executive committee 2004

'The third of the executive committee who retired in their turn were also re-elected: Mr Simon Ling, Mrs Cornelia Oddie, Mrs Valerie Riches and Mr Robert Whelan.'[59]

Trustees 2003

'Those third of the trustees who retired by rotation were re-elected: Mr Arthur Cornell, Dr John Guly and Mr Eric Hester.'[60]

Executive committee 2003

'The third of the executive committee who retired in their turn were also re-elected: Mrs Ann Allen; Betty, Lady Grantchester; Mrs Anna Lines; and Mrs Gillian White.[60]

Executive committee Circa 2002

Sponsors 2002

Executive committee Circa 2001

Mrs Anna Lines; Mrs Valerie Riches; Robert Whelan; and Mrs Gillian White. In addition, Mrs Ann Allen from Scotland was elected to the committee.[63]

Sponsors Circa 1990s

Sir Brian Thwaites, former chairman of the Wessex Regional Health Authority.[64]

Sponsors Circa 1980s

Sir Reginald Murley[65] | Christopher Whitehouse was a 'committee member' of Family and Youth Concern in the mid 1980s, according to The Times.[66] and was listed as its 'parliamentary officer' in 1989.[67] | Pete Dawson of the Professional Association of Teachers, the Rt Hon. Lord Shawcross, and Sir John Peel.[68]

Other personnel 1980s

Mrs Christine Kelly, West Midlands Chairman of Family and Youth Concern.[68]

Affiliations

Resources, Contact, Notes

Family Education Trust publications

  • Respect Begins at Home (FET leaflet first published 2006, revised 2012)
  • Sex Education in Primary Schools: Dispelling the Myths (leaflet)
  • Unhealthy Confusion: The impact of the Healthy Schools Programme on sexual health messages in our children's education 2011, 50pp.
  • Too Much, Too Soon: The government’s plans for your child’s sex education Norman Wells 2009, 52pp.
  • EDUCATION AND CULTURE Irina Tyk 2009, 18pp.
  • WAKING UP TO THE MORNING-AFTER PILL How parents are being undermined by the promotion of emergency hormonal birth control to under-16s Norman Wells and Helena Hayward December 2007, vi + 73pp.
  • SEX EDUCATION OR INDOCTRINATION? How ideology has triumphed over facts by Valerie Riches 2004, xiv + 79pp.
  • DECONSTRUCTING THE DUTCH UTOPIA Sex education and teenage pregnancy in the Netherlands by Joost van Loon 2003, 68pp.
  • SEX UNDER SIXTEEN? Young people comment on the social and educational influences on their behaviour by Clifford Hill 2000, 72pp.
  • THE FIGHT FOR THE FAMILY The adults behind children's rights by Lynette Burrows 1999, 96pp Price: £5.00
  • Hugo De Burgh and Robert Whelan, The Necessary Family And How To Support It Family Education Trust Pages: 53, 1996 ISBN-10: 0906229138 ISBN-13: 9780906229132
  • TRIED BUT UNTESTED The aims and outcomes of sex education in schools edited by Paul Danon 1995, 112pp.
  • BROKEN HOMES & BATTERED CHILDREN by Robert Whelan 1994, 96pp

Resources

See other Powerbase resources

CARE | Conservative Family Campaign | LIFE | Order of Christian Unity | National Campaign for the Family | Centre for Contemporary Ministry | Conservative Christian Fellowship | Lords and Commons Family and Child Protection Group Dame Jill Knight MP | Gerald Howarth MP

Contact

FET is registered as a charity in England and Wales by the Charity Commission (number 1070500).

Address: Jubilee House 19-21 High Street Whitton Twickenham TW2 7LB United Kingdom
Tel:02088942525
Email fyc@ukfamily.org.uk
Website: http://www.famyouth.org.uk/

Notes

  1. The latest archive copy of the Trust webpage holding the previous logo in the Internet Archive is dated 21 July 2011: Family Education Trust, accessed 19 March 2012
  2. 2.00 2.01 2.02 2.03 2.04 2.05 2.06 2.07 2.08 2.09 2.10 2.11 Family Education Trust About Us, accessed 22 August 2010
  3. Lynda Measor. Coralie Tiffin and Katrina Miller, Young people’s views on sex education: education, attitudes and behaviour, London: Routledge, 2000
  4. Martin Durham ‘The New Right, moral crusades and the politics of the family’, Economy and Society, 22(2) May 1993:253-6; p. 253
  5. J Somerville, ‘Shadow boxing in family politics: reply to Martin Durham’, Economy and society, 22(2) 1993:257-62; p. 257 + 261
  6. A M Wolpe Sex in Schools: Back to the future, Feminist Review, 1987
  7. Taxpayers' Alliance Supporters, Retrieved from the Internet Archive of 3 April 2010 on 20 March 2012.
  8. Dennis O'Keeffe, Professor Dennis O'Keeffe, Research Professor in Education, University of Buckingham, Retrieved from the Internet Archive of 29 October 2007 on 20 March 2012.
  9. Salisbury Review, Retrieved from the Internet Archive of 20 April 2010
  10. About Us, Civitas, accessed 3 June 2009.
  11. Centre for Social Justice Working Groups, accessed 19 March 2012
  12. Civitas What we do, accessed 19 March 2012
  13. Martin Durham ‘The conservative Party, New Labour and the Politics of the Family’, Parliamentary Affairs, 54, 2001:459-474; p. 461.
  14. Christian Medical Fellowship Trevor Stammers, accessed 23 March 2012
  15. Valerie and Denis Riches Built on Love, Oxford: Family Publications, 2007, p. 11.
  16. Valerie and Denis Riches Built on Love, Oxford: Family Publications, 2007, p. 152.
  17. 1004774 - THE CHRISTIAN INSTITUTE, Charity Commission, accessed March 2012
  18. Rosie Walker, Lobbying - The golden ticket Third Sector, 10 September 2008
  19. About Westminster 2010, Westminster 2010, accessed 20 April 2010.
  20. SEX UNDER SIXTEEN? Young people comment on the social and educational influences on their behaviour by Clifford Hill Family Education Trust, 2000, 72pp.
  21. Julia Langdon, Lady Young of Farnworth, The Guardian, 7 September 2002, accessed 28 March 2012
  22. Valerie Riches, Bulletin No. 109 Autumn 2002: The Baroness Young, DL, Family Education Trust website
  23. Baroness Young The Times (London), September 7, 2002, Saturday Features; 37
  24. Family Education Trust Annual General Meeting & Conference 23 June 2001 Bulletin No. 104 Summer 2001, Accessed 29 March 2012
  25. Ruth Gledhill and Lewis Smith Church's two wings are locked in moral combat, The Times (London) July 8, 2003, Tuesday Home news; 6.
  26. 26.0 26.1 26.2 The 13 voting members of the commission, Daily Telegraph, 12:01AM GMT 17 Jan 2002
  27. moralist, ‘’Merrian Webster Dictionary’’, accessed 6 March 2012
  28. 28.0 28.1 Family Education Trust Government must abandon plans to impose discriminatory regulations, says family group. New sexual orientation laws need to show more respect for freedom of conscience. Embargoed until 00.01 hours, Monday 11 December 2006, accessed 24 March 2012
  29. 29.0 29.1 Valerie and Denis Riches Built on Love, Oxford: Family Publications, 2007, p. 73.
  30. Norman Wells, Response: Don't believe the contraception industry: sex education doesn't work The Guardian, Comment is Free, 7 December 2007, accessed March 2012
  31. Miller, David, Kitzinger, J., Williams, K. and Beharrell, P. (1998), The Circuit of Mass Communication : Media Strategies, Representation and Audience Reception in the AIDS Crisis, London: Sage, p. 2-3.
  32. 11 December 1986
  33. Daily Telegraph, 2 May 1988
  34. Myles Harris, 'Why this sickly seless quango deserves to die', Daily Mail, 4 July 1994
  35. Daily Mail, 12 December 1986
  36. Martin Durham, 1991:123-31
  37. Norman Wells, Too Much, Too Soon, Family Education Trust 2009, accessed March 2012
  38. Latest Projects, Family Education Trust website, accessed 23 March 2012
  39. [www.famyouth.org.uk/pdfs/UnhealthyConfusionPressReleaseWeb.pdf Survey of local authorities reveals unhealthy confusion surrounding sexual health messages in schools, says national family charity], Family Education Trust press release, 26 September 2011, accessed March 2012
  40. Tom Peck, sex before marriage is path to misery and regret" The Independent, 8 November 2010, accessed March 2012
  41. CARE, Sex and Relationships Education Council Launched in Parliament this Week, press release dated 20 May 2011, accessed 20 March 2011
  42. Morality Forum Founders, accessed 24 March 2012
  43. Jennifer Bradly, Protests over sex education booklet UK Newsquest Regional Press - This is Local London December 12, 2003
  44. COALITION FOR MARRIAGE LIMITED, Company Data Rex, acc March 2011
  45. CARE, Sex and Relationships Education Council Launched in Parliament this Week, press release dated 20 May 2011, accessed 20 March 2011
  46. Charity Commission, 266382 - FAMILY EDUCATION TRUST, accessed 19 March 2012
  47. Charity Commission, 1070500 - FAMILY EDUCATION TRUST, accessed 19 March 2012
  48. Catherine Bennett,Valerie's moral lead The Guardian, 14 December 2000, accessed March 2012
  49. Rebecca O'Neill, Fiscal Policy and the Family: How the Family Fares in France, Germany and the UK, Institute for the Study of Civil Society, 2005
  50. Bulletin No. 100 Summer 2000, Family Education Trust,
  51. Annual General Meeting & Conference - 12 June 2004, Family Education Trust, Bulletin No. 116 Summer 2004, acc March 2012
  52. 52.0 52.1 Family Education Trust About, Accessed 21 March 2012
  53. Baroness Diana Elles (1921-2009) Bulletin No. 138, Winter 2009/2010, Family Education Trust website
  54. FET Annual Review 2010-11
  55. Charity Commission, FAMILY EDUCATION TRUST (A COMPANY LIMITED BY GUARANTEE) TRUSTEES' REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2009, accessed 28 March 2012
  56. Family Education Trust Annual Review 2010-11, available as a pdf download from website, accessed March 2012
  57. 57.0 57.1 Family Education Trust Who Are Your Trustees and Sponsors?, Retrieved from the Internet Archive of 26 July 2007 on 29 March 2012
  58. 58.0 58.1 Family and Youth Concern About Family and Youth concern, Retrieved from the Internet archive of 23 December 2005 on 19 March 2012
  59. 59.0 59.1 Family Education Trust Report on annual conference, Bulletin No. 116 Summer 2004
  60. 60.0 60.1 Family Education Trust FET AGM & Conference June 2003, Bulletin No. 112 Summer 2003
  61. Sarah Womack, Violence on children 'an everyday street sight', The Telegraph, June 10, 2002
  62. Valerie Riches, Bulletin No. 109 Autumn 2002: The Baroness Young, DL, Family Education Trust website
  63. Family Education Trust Annual General Meeting & Conference 23 June 2001 Bulletin No. 104 Summer 2001, Accessed 29 March 2012
  64. David Brindle, Celibacy urged in schools film, The Guardian (London), September 5, 1990
  65. Martin Durham Sex and Politics: The Family and Morality in the Thatcher Years, Houndmills, Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1991, p. 129
  66. Andrew Lycett, Spectrum: Foot soldiers in the army of morality, The Times (London) January 5 1987, Monday, Issue 62657.
  67. Patricia Wynn Davies Family groups attack moves to liberalise incest law The Independent May 26 1989, Friday Home News ; Pg. 2
  68. 68.0 68.1 Sarah Jane Evans, Guardian Women (MsPrint): With Gillick in mind / The law and books on sex education, The Guardian (London) April 17, 1985
  69. COALITION FOR MARRIAGE LIMITED, Company Data Rex, acc March 2011
  70. CARE, Sex and Relationships Education Council Launched in Parliament this Week, press release dated 20 May 2011, accessed 20 March 2011
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